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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Sex Linked Mutations - and how it works

Sex-linked: For a female to be produced the male parent must be at least split for the mutation. For a male to be produced the male parent must be at least split for the mutation and the female parent must visually show the mutation. Females cannot be split for sex-linked mutations, only the males. You have no way of knowing what mutations, if any, a male may be split to unless you know what mutations the birds parents were, or by test breeding.

Sex-Linked mutations : Pearl, Cinnamon, Lutino, and Yellow-faced

Basic Genetic Results
Normal Male x Normal Female = 100% Normal Offspring

Sex-Linked Male x Sex-Linked Female = 100% Sex-Linked Offspring (meaning you will get both Males & Females who are visually the sex linked mutation)

Sex-Linked Male x Normal Female = 50% Normal Males that are Split to the Mutation, 50% Sex-Linked Females.

Sex-Linked Female x Normal Male = 50% Normal Males that are Split to the Mutation, 50% Normal Females.

Recessive x Recessive (Sex Doesn't Matter) = 100% Recessive Offspring

Recessive x Normal = 100% Split to the Mutation Offspring

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  • Males have two "X" chromosomes; females have only one. The genes causing the color mutations Cinnamon, Lutino, Pearl, and Yellow-Cheek, are always found on the X chromosome, NEVER on the Y. Because there is no color gene present on the Y chromosome which might mask the sex linked color, female cockatiels will always VISUALLY show Cinnamon, Lutino, Pearl and/or Yellow-Cheek if it is present on their X chromosome. A female, therefore, can never be SPLIT to Cinnamon, Lutino, Pearl or Yellow-Cheek. A good rule to remember here is "what you see is what you get"!Males, however, may carry one or more of the sex linked genes on only ONE of their two X chromosomes. If they do, the DOMINANT NORMAL will mask that trait, and the male will be considered SPLIT to that mutation. For example, if a male carries Pearl on only one of his X chromosomes, which would be genetically coded X XP, he is split to pearl. If he carries Cinnamon on the other X chromosome (XC XP), he would be split to Cinnamon AND Pearl since he only has one gene for each color. If, however, he had Cinnamon and Pearl on the SAME X chromosome (XCP X) he would be split to cinnamon-pearl. NOTE: It makes no difference whether the sex linked gene is carried on the first X chromosome or the second in the genetic code.
    A male cockatiel will always donate one of his two X chromosomes to the offspring, but a female can donate either her X or her Y. If the mother passes along her one X chromosome, the offspring is MALE (X X). If she gives her Y chromosome instead, the result is a FEMALE (X Y). In sex linked mutations, it is good to remember that males will always throw daughters of the same mutation, and mothers will always have sons that are at least split to any mutation they carry.






 

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I would add to that:

Females can have a maximum of one gene for a sex-linked mutation, and they get it from their father only. If they have the gene they will have the mutation, since it takes only one copy of the gene to produce the mutation in a female. It is impossible for females to pass the gene for a sex-linked mutation to their daughters, but they will pass it to all of their sons.

It takes two copies of the gene (one from each parent) to produce the mutation in males. If they have only one copy, they will be split for the mutation.
 

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Great article! I gotta be honest I'm the type of person that can read the whole things and still not know one things about what I just read and that happens to me when it comes to tiel genetics but regardless, thanks alot for posting. It's got lots of info for people who have the attention span larger then a pea!
 

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I really want to learn about this, but it's like doing math, my brain refused to understand it. lol :blush:
 

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Yes, exactly. The first few lines I'm thinking wow this is interesting, a few lines after that I'm sitting here re-reading the same thing again and again with a blank stare, and the start of a headache. So my way of finding out the color of my babies. It's very scientific...ready for it...wait till they grow feathers..then moult..then wow ending color = baby's mutation. lol that's my plan. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
lol i understand where your both coming from there was one page that went all scientific on me like NP Xnl kind of thing (not the same exact way but as an example) and i was so completely lost it wasn't even funny

I was hoping to find one with pictures (i'm much better at under standing with pictures of what i'm reading about lol) but i had no luck

so i took the ones that seemed the easiest to understand and went with that :)
 

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sex-linked mutations.. lutino, cinnamon and pearl...

to get females you just need a male who is either visual or split to any of them and pair him with whatever hen, and any chicks that are lutino, cinnamon or pearl WILL be females

to get males then mom HAS to be VISUALLY a lutino, a cinnamon or a pearl and dad split to them in order to get a male chick that is visual... to get a male that is split it only takes either mom or dad to have the gene for him to be in split form which means he can later pass it on to his daughters in visual form and to his sons in split form
 

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I really want to learn about this, but it's like doing math, my brain refused to understand it
It's hard to understand tiel genetics. You know how in humans the males are XY and the females are XX? Well it's like that with cockatiels too, only backward. The males are XX and the females are XY. It took me three days to even begin to wrap my mind around that.

But it's the key to the whole sex-linked mutation business. The sex-linked mutations are carried on the X chromosome, on the part of the X that corresponds to the "missing" leg of the Y. Meaning that there's nothing on the Y chromosome to offset the mutation gene that's on the X. This is why females only need one gene to have the mutation: no other gene will be paired up with it so it controls her color. It's also the reason that females get the gene from their father and not their mother. Girls get their X chromosome from their father and a Y from their mother. The sex-linked mutations are found only on the X.

Males have two X's, so every gene on one X will be paired up with a gene on the other X. In males, the sex-linked mutations function the same way as a regular recessive gene. He has to get the mutation on both X's (one from each parent) for it to affect his color.
 

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ok so I'm even more lost after all of you trying to explain it then I was after reading the first post. I think I need to see pictures too...I agree with Aly...on this subject, my brain is the size of a pea. LOL
 

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this is a lil something I did using a lutino pearl as example... but you can substitute lutino with cinnamon, pearl or any of their combinations: lutino pearl, cinnamon pearl, cinnamon lutino, etc...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
this is a lil something I did using a lutino pearl as example... but you can substitute lutino with cinnamon, pearl or any of their combinations: lutino pearl, cinnamon pearl, cinnamon lutino, etc...
Thank you for that, that is exactly what i meant by I do better with pictures :D

thanks for taking the time to do that :)
 

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Wow - I feel so smart - for a change!! I actually GOT IT - for a change! I have a glimmer of understanding here and I am STOKED! Thank you SO much for explaing this to me - I've been reading up on other sites and books and I just didn't get it until now!

THANK YOU!!
 

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That is a great way to explain it as it is one of those subjects that tends to slide off your brain 'till one day it's as if a light comes on and you get it. However on you last page where you pair 2 grays with the Father split for Lutino Pearl it sounds as if you are saying that ALL the male offspring would be also split for Lutino and pearl. I'm not sure if that's what you meant but in reality only roughly half of the males would get those splits.
 

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I'm not sure what I meant either - maybe that's the way I understood it until I read up more on the subject elsewhere on this site?? I've had a mini-stroke a few years back, so at times it's hard for me to explain myself the way I want unless I reread something like 10 times and edit it about 20, lol. I'm re-learning all this stuff about genetics from before my problem started, so re-understanding it comes in little glimmers and flashes, I'm afraid.

In retrospect (this is one of my editings, lol!) I have a Lutino Pearl male, a Normal male split to Cinnamon, Pied and Pearl, and a Normal male split to Whiteface and Lutino. Maybe I just wrote it down wrong in my other post?
 

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yeah in the last one... some would be normals and half would carry the split... just as you said Sue.. ;).. seems I erased the word "some" before naming the splits :p.. hehe
 
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