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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
4 days ago i started training my cockatiel target training. It works great but there is a problem.
When rewarding him some spray millet and eats a couple times he becomes like a statue and moves his head slowly and looks arround my room.
He does that for 30 seconds or 1 minute and then he starts responding again.
Even waving my finger or the stick to him doesn't wake him up.

Is the millet the cause of this or something else?
 

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Wow...what a weird response to spray millet! Either he really REALLY likes it, or he's having some reaction to it.

Hopefully someone with more experience will be able to help you. I'm not sure what to make of the situation.
 

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Is it possible that he is tracking something with his eyes, like a bit of dust floating around, or a small bug (like a fruit fly)? Sammy does this from time to time, watching 'bird dust' float around after he gives a big shake.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Wow...what a weird response to spray millet! Either he really REALLY likes it, or he's having some reaction to it.

Hopefully someone with more experience will be able to help you. I'm not sure what to make of the situation.
I found out that my new lamp in the ceiling is the cause of this. He doesn't anything this days but just looking at it like its an angel. Pretty funny but doesn't this hurts his eyes?
 

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There's a condition called 'stargazing' that can have a number of causes including nutritional problems, infection and other factors not all of which are understood. You would need to rule out problems through a vet who would need to be familiar with the condition. Search the internet using 'avian stargazing' for more info on the subject and ask your vet if they're familiar with it.
I had a tiel that exhibited this problem many years ago when little was known about it. In his case, it usually happened after some exertion like a short flight across the room - not all the time but randomly. Vets at the time didn't know what to make of it and the internet had little to nothing on the subject. I also didn't know how to best describe the problem so that made investigating it difficult. The search terms I gave will help you look into it.

edit: I would change the lighting back to the way it was to see if the lighting is in fact the cause - this is starting from the simplest point and working from there. High efficiency lighting today works much differently than the old-style bulbs did - one big change is that many lamps/bulbs flicker at a high frequency that is not normally perceptible to humans but could be potentially bothersome to other creatures such as birds whose vision is believed to be more complex than ours. (Sometimes bulbs interfere with television/home entertainment system remote control operation because of the high frequency flickering and that's not obvious at all!)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There's a condition called 'stargazing' that can have a number of causes including nutritional problems, infection and other factors not all of which are understood. You would need to rule out problems through a vet who would need to be familiar with the condition. Search the internet using 'avian stargazing' for more info on the subject and ask your vet if they're familiar with it.
I had a tiel that exhibited this problem many years ago when little was known about it. In his case, it usually happened after some exertion like a short flight across the room - not all the time but randomly. Vets at the time didn't know what to make of it and the internet had little to nothing on the subject. I also didn't know how to best describe the problem so that made investigating it difficult. The search terms I gave will help you look into it.

edit: I would change the lighting back to the way it was to see if the lighting is in fact the cause - this is starting from the simplest point and working from there. High efficiency lighting today works much differently than the old-style bulbs did - one big change is that many lamps/bulbs flicker at a high frequency that is not normally perceptible to humans but could be potentially bothersome to other creatures such as birds whose vision is believed to be more complex than ours. (Sometimes bulbs interfere with television/home entertainment system remote control operation because of the high frequency flickering and that's not obvious at all!)
Well i can't change the ceiling light back since i replaced the whole thing with a new one since the old one didn't work.

My cockatiel looks like it loves it by staring it for hours on the afternoon.
Doesn't it hurt him for staring it for such a long time?
 

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...My cockatiel looks like it loves it by staring it for hours on the afternoon.
Doesn't it hurt him for staring it for such a long time?
I've never heard of another bird doing that with a light source and since no one here has said their bird stares at a light, I'd say it's not good that yours does it, but I don't know if it's bad for him either. If my Percy did that and I thought it might be a fixation on a light fixture I just installed, I'd conduct a test by adding a different light source somewhere in the room and turning off the one he seems to be staring at to see if that makes a difference.
 
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