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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone!

In late july, 2015 i purchased Kuifie at 4 months old from a nice, experienced breeder. anyways, she has been on a good diet of pellets, dried fruits/veggies, and seeds. she eats well and on occasion i give her egg. I have yet to give her meats, but sometime soon i will.

she has not seen a vet yet, and is coming up on 1 year old. she seems very healthy, social and playful.

Im only 13, so i cant afford everything for her, but im wondering how often she needs a checkup, should it be routine? my mother, unfortunately, says that because it is just a bird it is just a waste of money for a checkup revealing no problems. Should she have her first visit? she seems completely healthy and whatnot, always vocal, playing, sleeping, exploring, she even enjoys chewing on our dogs' fur (which he is used to now). i think my mother knows well, and i trust her, however i do want to know if it is a good idea for checkups.

also, any treat recipes or diets? how often should she be weighed? :wf pied:

edit: as this is one of my first posts i noticed this isnt in the correct category. oops.
 

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she has not seen a vet yet, and is coming up on 1 year old. she seems very healthy, social and playful.
It is recommended when adopting a new bird that you take them into the vet when you first get them as a preliminary checkup.

Im only 13, so i cant afford everything for her, but im wondering how often she needs a checkup, should it be routine? my mother, unfortunately, says that because it is just a bird it is just a waste of money for a checkup revealing no problems.
I'm sorry, but your mother has the wrong attitude about bird ownership. Especially when saying "just a bird". A pet bird is equal to or possibly even MORE work to keep as a pet than a dog. Some pet birds (such as macaws) can even be like caring for a 4 yr old for 65+ years who never grows up. Does your dog get regular checkups? Are the dog's vet checkups (even when he gets the all-clear) a waste of money? Because a bird is exactly the same in that aspect.

As for how often; I can't quite say. I'm lucky enough to work at a bird rescue where the women in charge, Jody, is glad to give Kirby free checkups every so often. Plus, because I take him to work with me often, he isn't under stress when taken there until Jody wraps him in a blanket, lol :lol:

If I had to say, though, I would say that it depends on the individual bird. For example, how healthy the bird is. A bird who has great health for the most part probably doesn't need as many checkups as one with, say, respiratory issues. Also, how much stress does a vet trip cause a bird? If it's extreme, panic-attack level stress, then it might be wise to opt for fewer checkups. How expensive an average checkup must also be taken into consideration. There are lots of other factors as well, so overall I would say definetly take your bird in sometime soon for their preliminary checkup and then ask the vet what they would recommend for your bird.

Another thing it might depend on is the bird's grooming. Who's clipping and filing her toenails? Who's filing her beak? Who's clipping her wings, if you make that decision? If you're planning on having the vet do these for you, then you will end up having more visits simply because the bird will need it; I've only had Kirby for two months and have already had his wings reclipped, his toenails done, and his beak filed, and in a couple more weeks I'll have to take him in to get his toenails done again.

If you don't want to take her to the vet for grooming, then I would suggest finding a professional groomer in your area or learning to do it yourself. If you choose to clip your bird, though, have the vet clip them. It is so dangerous to let just anybody do it because if the feathers are clipped too short it can cause permanent damage to your birds wings and if they aren't clipped enough (especially with smaller birds), the bird could still get enough lift to get away.

Also, if you're going to clip, there are different ways of doing. I think it's just two (though I may be wrong): a partial clip and a full clip. A partial clip leaves some of the flight feathers, just enough so that the bird can still fly, just not up or for too long. I keep Kirby at a partial clip so that he can still fly AND we have three dogs, so we want him to be able to get away from them if they start harassing him until we can get him.

also, any treat recipes or diets?
I use millet spray with Kirby as a treat. You can buy it at your local pet store. I got a smaller bag from Petsmart for about 5 bucks (maybe less) and it still hasn't run out. Just be sure not to give them too much because then it will lose it's appeal as a reward (this goes for any treat). A treat is a treat because it is something special.
 

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vet questions

Welcome Marcel! As you will see, there is a lot of info to be had here!
As for me, I try to take Bennie to the vet once a year, unless, of course I notice a problem. I like to have the vet clip his nails, but since that needs to be done more often, sometimes I do it myself. I don't like to, because he hates it and struggles. A bird can bleed to death from a nail cut too short, so I try to be VERY careful. I know it is expensive, but birds should be taken to the vet for a wellness check-up. Enjoy your bird, and I hope your Mom will understand.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It is recommended when adopting a new bird that you take them into the vet when you first get them as a preliminary checkup.



I'm sorry, but your mother has the wrong attitude about bird ownership. Especially when saying "just a bird". A pet bird is equal to or possibly even MORE work to keep as a pet than a dog. Some pet birds (such as macaws) can even be like caring for a 4 yr old for 65+ years who never grows up. Does your dog get regular checkups? Are the dog's vet checkups (even when he gets the all-clear) a waste of money? Because a bird is exactly the same in that aspect.

As for how often; I can't quite say. I'm lucky enough to work at a bird rescue where the women in charge, Jody, is glad to give Kirby free checkups every so often. Plus, because I take him to work with me often, he isn't under stress when taken there until Jody wraps him in a blanket, lol :lol:

If I had to say, though, I would say that it depends on the individual bird. For example, how healthy the bird is. A bird who has great health for the most part probably doesn't need as many checkups as one with, say, respiratory issues. Also, how much stress does a vet trip cause a bird? If it's extreme, panic-attack level stress, then it might be wise to opt for fewer checkups. How expensive an average checkup must also be taken into consideration. There are lots of other factors as well, so overall I would say definetly take your bird in sometime soon for their preliminary checkup and then ask the vet what they would recommend for your bird.

Another thing it might depend on is the bird's grooming. Who's clipping and filing her toenails? Who's filing her beak? Who's clipping her wings, if you make that decision? If you're planning on having the vet do these for you, then you will end up having more visits simply because the bird will need it; I've only had Kirby for two months and have already had his wings reclipped, his toenails done, and his beak filed, and in a couple more weeks I'll have to take him in to get his toenails done again.

If you don't want to take her to the vet for grooming, then I would suggest finding a professional groomer in your area or learning to do it yourself. If you choose to clip your bird, though, have the vet clip them. It is so dangerous to let just anybody do it because if the feathers are clipped too short it can cause permanent damage to your birds wings and if they aren't clipped enough (especially with smaller birds), the bird could still get enough lift to get away.

Also, if you're going to clip, there are different ways of doing. I think it's just two (though I may be wrong): a partial clip and a full clip. A partial clip leaves some of the flight feathers, just enough so that the bird can still fly, just not up or for too long. I keep Kirby at a partial clip so that he can still fly AND we have three dogs, so we want him to be able to get away from them if they start harassing him until we can get him.



I use millet spray with Kirby as a treat. You can buy it at your local pet store. I got a smaller bag from Petsmart for about 5 bucks (maybe less) and it still hasn't run out. Just be sure not to give them too much because then it will lose it's appeal as a reward (this goes for any treat). A treat is a treat because it is something special.
thank you for your input! Luckily clipping and nail trimming isnt a problem, as my family has experience with birds in the past. she has had one trim and is due for another. now, i would stress that my mother understands her importance to me, however she believes that kuifie is completely healthy and there is no need for a vet checkup. i may bring this up at the dinner table tonight once more, but i doubt ill get any different answer, because the nearest avian clinic is far from our home.

as for treats, i do give her millet spray, and she loves it. i am, of course, trying to give her smaller amounts as a treat and trick reward (for example, shes learning how to high five!) thanks again,

Marcel
 

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however she believes that kuifie is completely healthy and there is no need for a vet checkup.
I hate how harsh I've been sounding about your mother, but I'm afraid I'm going to do it again simply because this is so important: She is not a vet. There could be something going on underneath the surface of the bird that you can't see (for example, cockatiels are one of the pet birds MOST LIKELY to contract cancer). For all you know, there's a tumor somewhere, or a cancerous cell, etc. It's always good to have regular health checkups (though HOW regular depends on the stuff I was saying before). So when you talk to your mom tonight, maybe mention something about how she isn't a vet (but maybe a little more respectfully :lol:) and that there could be something under the surface that needs to be addressed and isn't showing outward symptoms at the moment. And if she says "then wait for the outward symptoms and then we'll deal with it" that's a bad idea as well. Cockatiels can go from bad to worse to completely unstable very quickly. Remember that birds are much smaller than us; their systems are much smaller, and so if something goes wrong that's so much less time for it to be solved, unlike us.

Like I said, I'm really sorry if I seem to be really harsh in the way that I'm speaking to your mom. I'm not trying to, I'm just trying to be firm. She isn't a vet and cannot say with absolute certainty "your bird is healthy, she doesn't need a pointless checkup", because she can't possibly know that.

Now, most likely the bird is fine, but that doesn't make the checkup pointless. I'd rather spend money once a year to have someone tell me that my bird is 100% healthy than save money and find out someday that my bird is really sick without outward symptoms (unlikely but can happen).

Good luck tonight :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I hate how harsh I've been sounding about your mother, but I'm afraid I'm going to do it again simply because this is so important: She is not a vet. There could be something going on underneath the surface of the bird that you can't see (for example, cockatiels are one of the pet birds MOST LIKELY to contract cancer). For all you know, there's a tumor somewhere, or a cancerous cell, etc. It's always good to have regular health checkups (though HOW regular depends on the stuff I was saying before). So when you talk to your mom tonight, maybe mention something about how she isn't a vet (but maybe a little more respectfully :lol:) and that there could be something under the surface that needs to be addressed and isn't showing outward symptoms at the moment. And if she says "then wait for the outward symptoms and then we'll deal with it" that's a bad idea as well. Cockatiels can go from bad to worse to completely unstable very quickly. Remember that birds are much smaller than us; their systems are much smaller, and so if something goes wrong that's so much less time for it to be solved, unlike us.

Like I said, I'm really sorry if I seem to be really harsh in the way that I'm speaking to your mom. I'm not trying to, I'm just trying to be firm. She isn't a vet and cannot say with absolute certainty "your bird is healthy, she doesn't need a pointless checkup", because she can't possibly know that.

Now, most likely the bird is fine, but that doesn't make the checkup pointless. I'd rather spend money once a year to have someone tell me that my bird is 100% healthy than save money and find out someday that my bird is really sick without outward symptoms (unlikely but can happen).

Good luck tonight :)
of course, i wasnt thinking you are harsh at all. your "not a vet" and "there might be something underneath" quotes are really what i think as well.

kuifie is sitting with me now, luckily not chewing my laptop keys :p

thanks again!
 

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Honestly, I never took my birds in unless they were sick. Which seemed to be a yearly thing lol. There is nothing wrong with doing a wellness check up and asking them to run a fecal to make sure everything is OK. But, in regards to cancer, unless she has a noticeable lump or they actually do xrays on her, they aren't going to notice that either. You could also ask for blood work (they would clip her nail extra short to collect it) but that's only if you really want those results. As a person who works in the veterinary field, it's always good to get a baseline for lab results. This way, if she ever does get sick and needs to be seen, they know what her normal tests look like so they can compare her sick ones to her healthy ones.

As for price, you could always call and get an estimate over the phone. I like to do that, then save my money for the visit. I also have care credit, which is a healthcare credit card and is great to use in case of emergencies (I also used it for the spays on both my dogs.)

I'll move your thread to the correct spot! ;)
 

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I have taken my birds when I get suspicious of something (like last time, when my hen injured her mouth some how and i feared an infection might occur).

You'll probbaly be ok without check ups? But I would suggest you do you best to do check ups on your bird yourself. Like her weight, observing their feathers, diet, droppings. All that goodstuff that we usually do anyways. But, know where and who the avian vet is and you should be ok.

And money wise, its usually pretty cheap. Honestly, when I took my hen in, she was evaluated and inspected head to toe, including a nail trim all for only $45(usd that is lol). Mind, it was a mouth injury, and he used special equipment and it was still really cheap. ALWAYS go to an avian specialist though.

Good luck!
 

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ALWAYS go to an avian specialist though
Sometimes that isn't an option. There wasn't an avian specialist within two hours of me when I lived in WA. But my local vet worked with birds all the time and if he didn't know something, he called the specialist at the university of wa for a consult. No extra charge. You have to work with what's available. A specialist is nice, but not everyone has access to one.
 

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I would definitely go to the vet at least once, soon. Some diseases are not easily noticeable without a vet doing some tests. I know people who don't take their bird in often, but they did take them in when they first brought them home. If you are 13 now, you could have this bird when you are 30. Mom should take you once. Offer to pay for part of it, or use birthday money on it.
 

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It's also important that you at least visit your vet a few times to establish a connection with them and history file for your birds. It's easier to figure out solutions to problems when the vet knows what's "normal" for your bird, what kind of care you provide it, any previous case history, and so on. As you build a connection with your vet, they may even open up to phone consultations, alternative treatments, payment plans, etc. which can really help in dire situations.

Some recommend doing CBC/chem panels, disease tests, and cultures done when you get a new bird, but my vet didn't recommend it for healthy, young birds as they rarely find anything and it's a lot of stress/money. For older birds with a history of neglect/poor care, I would have them done just so you know what you're dealing with.
 
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