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Discussion Starter #1
So Rocko's stomach was first yellow brownish and the vet said it was infected a few days later there was a scab which means it was healing and a few days ago the scab fell off and now his stomach area is red and I was thinking maybe because he was too hot because he was wearing his flightsuit and hoodie or maybe his blood going to that area because blood travels to an area thats healing.
 

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It could be scarring, but red generally indicates inflammation. I'd be concerned about ongoing internal infection if it were my bird.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It could be scarring, but red generally indicates inflammation. I'd be concerned about ongoing internal infection if it were my bird.
Does it not show its healing.Scabs is the infection being kicked out and healing underneath.What do u mean internal infection.
 

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No, a scab doesn't have anything to do with an infection healing. The scab is simply the process by which the skin closes itself. The scab fell off because the skin is now closed, but that doesn't necessarily mean the infection is gone. If the infection spread to the tissue below the skin that closed, it could still be there in either the deeper soft tissue layers or could spread to the blood. It's much harder to treat an infection that's in the deeper layers of tissue or blood, which is why it's best to use antibiotics early in the healing process, while a wound is still open.

P.S. Mods, can we please get this thread moved to the health section where it belongs?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No, a scab doesn't have anything to do with an infection healing. The scab is simply the process by which the skin closes itself. The scab fell off because the skin is now closed, but that doesn't necessarily mean the infection is gone. If the infection spread to the tissue below the skin that closed, it could still be there in either the deeper soft tissue layers or could spread to the blood. It's much harder to treat an infection that's in the deeper layers of tissue or blood, which is why it's best to use antibiotics early in the healing process, while a wound is still open.

P.S. Mods, can we please get this thread moved to the health section where it belongs?
Yeah I put it in the Talk section because it was like a chat now its health.
So basically the infection is trapped? One reason why I wouldnt wanna use the cream is because Rocko would pick at it and then make it worse.
 

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Thread has been moved.

Inflammation and erythema (redness of the skin) is a sign of an infection under the skin. That's the main reason everyone suggested the oral antibiotics.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thread has been moved.

Inflammation and erythema (redness of the skin) is a sign of an infection under the skin. That's the main reason everyone suggested the oral antibiotics.
What is oral antibiotics and is it too late to give antibiotics since the wound has closed.
 

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Antibiotics administered orally (by mouth) are more effective than a topicsl (cream or ointmemt) at penetrating tissue throughout the body and therefore treating internal infections. You should consult with your vet as far as what should be done for treatment now.
 

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Oh ok yeah I thought those antibiotics would be better than the cream too ill let my Vet know when I make my appointment.
 

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I'd take him back to the vet and have the vet check him out again. Vet will probably want to do some sort of testing for infection so that he/she can prescribe the correct medication to combat any infection present.

A scab is just a crust that forms over a healing wound for the purpose of preventing foreign bodies and outside infections from getting into the new skin as it grows. When the new skin is done growing and the wound has healed, the scab will fall of, as it has done with your bird. The skin under a scab should be a healthy pink colour as it is brand new skin. If it is red and inflamed, this definitely indicates some sort of underlying infection that could possibly kill your bird if left untreated.

Whatever your vet prescribes, please do it, even if you think a different treatment might work better. He knows what he's doing and he knows what is best for your bird's condition. There is a good possibility that this could have been prevented if you'd used the cream that was first prescribed. Anti-inflammatory/antibiotic creams can do wonderful things if applied when prescribed and can often eliminate the need for stronger antibiotics. And in my experience, creams are a lot easier to put on a bird than giving oral antibiotics. Most birds i've had to medicate orally hate the taste of it and they'll fight it so there's always a risk of aspiration.
 

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Most birds i've had to medicate orally hate the taste of it and they'll fight it so there's always a risk of aspiration.
While I completely agree with the rest of your post, I wanted to let you know that there isn't a significant risk from aspiration of antibiotics. Generally the problem with aspiration is that it introduces infectious agents to the delicate respiratory tissues. But since antibiotics kill infectious agents, they're not going to cause infection like aspiration of food or water or juice might. Also, most birds that shake their heads and snort/gurgle after being given oral meds haven't actually aspirated, they've just managed to get some meds into their nose through the choanal slit in the roof of their mouth. That's uncomfortable but not in any way harmful.

I hope that might put your mind at ease a bit. I used to have the same worry when giving oral medications, but after discussing it with my vets, I learned that it's not a problem. :)
 

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Thanks for that enigma! I've had to give a few birds (not always mine, my friends always seem to call on me to do it for them lol) oral medications and while I always thought the fact that it's an antibiotic would contradict any chance of infection from it going down the wrong hole, it's still always nerve wracking when they fight the crap out of it and then make all sorts of coughing and snorting noises and you're just like "oh crap please don't choke on it" haha. Very good to know. I had to give Zoe antibiotics when she was 6 weeks old and she really did not make it easy lol!
 

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Thanks for that enigma! I've had to give a few birds (not always mine, my friends always seem to call on me to do it for them lol) oral medications and while I always thought the fact that it's an antibiotic would contradict any chance of infection from it going down the wrong hole, it's still always nerve wracking when they fight the crap out of it and then make all sorts of coughing and snorting noises and you're just like "oh crap please don't choke on it" haha. Very good to know. I had to give Zoe antibiotics when she was 6 weeks old and she really did not make it easy lol!
It's terribly dramatic, I agree! I will admit to finding it kind of gut-wrenching to watch even though I know it's not really a problem.

One thing I have found helps a lot is that if you hold the bird on their side (their left side up) with their head restrained and drip the meds onto the side of the beak, the bird will open his/her beak and swallow it reflexively. That way you don't have to fight to actually get the syringe into the beak. Holding onto the head for a bit longer after the med is ingested will get most birds to swallow it too, although I have definitely worked with some stubborn individuals who insist on slinging it everywhere no matter what you do.

BTW, while it's no fun having to give meds a lot, I've definitely found that it's improved my skills drastically! So, you know, having the experience of helping your friends with their birds will mean you're a total pro if you ever have to do it in an emergency. :)
 

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This is very true! I am a lot better at it now than I was when I first had to medicate a bird. I can do it with a degree of confidence now lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
He would pick at it and make it worse with cream I am bringing him to the vet again like I said.Just to mention its not an Avian vet but he works with birds.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
When will he be seeing the vet?
The bird vet is there on Tuesdays and Fridays and I was busy today ill have to ring and see is he there tomorrow or Thursday.His skin is not red anymore its pink and yellowish.And it looks like theres a small scab.
 

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I really can't stress enough how important it is to get him treatment quickly. This definitely doesn't sound like normal healing and it's already gone on for multiple weeks. Waiting to get him the treatment he needs decreases the chances that he'll have a full recovery.
 

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Regardless of whether or not anyone thinks he's feeling better, he really, really needs to see a vet sooner rather than later. As enigma said, it doesn't sound like it's healing normally and I am really worried that there's some kind of internal infection going on. Remember that birds have an uncanny ability to hide an illness until they don't have the energy to hide it anymore, which is usually when it's too late or very close to it.

Let us know what your vet says!
 
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