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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I am new here. We got this lovely cockatiel a month ago, it was supposed to be 12 weeks old (so around 4 months as of today). I am wondering if you could help me tell if it is a male or a female. When we bought the breeder said it is high likely going to be a male.

Regardless, it is really cute and started to learn few tricks; no issues hand feeding etc. it does make some nice voices from time to time but I think it is still young.

thanks a lot
 

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I think it is female from her face and tail fethear ..
And u say she does sound but not sing this another sign
 

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Discussion Starter #3
4 months is a bit too early to sing, no? I think it will be easier to identify in a few more months when it goes through its molt.
 

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Hi all,

I am new here. We got this lovely cockatiel a month ago, it was supposed to be 12 weeks old (so around 4 months as of today). I am wondering if you could help me tell if it is a male or a female. When we bought the breeder said it is high likely going to be a male.

Regardless, it is really cute and started to learn few tricks; no issues hand feeding etc. it does make some nice voices from time to time but I think it is still young.

thanks a lot
I used to be able to tell by feeling the pelvic bone. I was a breeder a while back. If you take your bird to an experienced person, they can tell you for sure. Good luck!
 

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Teils cannot usually be told their sex by looking at it. I had to get them sexed with a kit sent to a lab.
 

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It's too soon to tell. Wait until the bird has its first molt (which usually happens at around 6 months old), and then you will know for sure.Your bird is a normal grey, and with normal greys the changes that do or do not occur after the first molt are a VERY reliable indicator. If it's a girl, the new feathers will look the same as the old. If it's a boy, it will start to develop a bright yellow face mask, and the feathers on the wings and tail with spots and barring will start being replaced by solid grey feathers. It might take two or more molts for the color transition to be complete, but you'll know what's happening after the first molt.

It looks like the bird might be starting to develop a bit of a yellow face mask already, but babies and hens can have some yellow feathers near the beak so this might not mean anything. The yellow patch on the back of the head doesn't indicate gender - it's a sign that the bird is split to the pied mutation.

Techniques like pelvic bone sexing and wing spot sexing are only partly reliable. A girl can seem like a boy and vice versa. DNA testing is much more reliable, but there's no need to go for that if you're willing to wait for the bird to start molting.
 

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I was very good at sexing by the pelvic bone. I kept up with the owners that I sold to. It’s rather accurate if you know how to do it
 

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I've seen experts get the wrong answer with pelvic sexing, and the internet in general agrees that it's not particularly reliable. Ditto for the wing-spot sexing method in cockatiels - it's more accurate than flipping a coin, but not nearly as accurate as a DNA test. Here's what the Niles Animal Hospital has to say about pelvic sexing at https://nilesanimalhospital.com/files/2012/05/Sex-Determination-in-Pet-Birds.pdf

"Numerous other techniques are used to determine the sex of pet birds, but most of them are quite questionable. One such method is pelvic sexing, where the bird’s pelvic bones are palpated on the ventral abdomen to determine the amount of space between them. According to proponents of this method, males have very little space between the pelvic bones whereas females have widely spaced bones. Anyone with extensive experience with birds of known sex, however, realizes that wide variations exist between the sexes in pelvic spacing, making this technique highly unreliable."
 

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Well then... DNA. It might be your opinion that I am wrong but I did it successfully. I bred birds for a long time. Successfully.I was able to buy breeders according to my method and reproduce. I wouldn’t have been able to have mating pairs if I bought the wrong sex.
 
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