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Discussion Starter #1
This post is about seeking advice on preventing female cockatiels from wanting to stimulate themselves so they are not prompted to lay eggs (this caused my bird to have a cloaca prolapse)

A little background on Buster's "self-stimulation" issue
A while back I noticed Buster (yes, she's female) rubbing her bottom against the bottom corner of her cage while making repetitive squeaking noises. At the time I didn't know what she was doing and why. I now know that she was stimulating herself, and that eventually led up to some problems with egg-laying. She is the only bird in her cage, and no other male birds are around to fertilize her eggs.

She was laying more infertile eggs than normal, producing huge droppings, and spending most of her time at the bottom of her cage on top of the eggs. I had taken her to the vet a handful of times to address this issue, and I had also noticed that the area around her cloaca had been puffy for a while. She started laying abnormal/soft eggs, and it was much stress on her and me as well. After these vet visits and trying to keep her from laying eggs her cloaca prolapsed. ):

I immediately rushed her to the vet, and he repaired her cloaca. This happened back in August of 2013, but she's starting to do the self-stimulation thing in the bottom of her cage again. She doesn't do it often, but she seems to do it when she really wants attention from my mom or me. This really worries me because of everything she went through after her prolapse and recovery from it being repaired. She's a little trooper, and I want to prevent any pain/stress on her.

Advice?
What help/suggestions do you all have for me to prevent her from wanting to stimulate herself?

Also appreciate any of your advice on preventing cockatiels from wanting to lay eggs?

Lastly
Have any of you experienced this issue with your female tiels? It helps knowing that someone else can relate.

Thank you!!! <3
Audra Marie
 

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How many hours a night do you cover her cage? If you keep her cage covered for at least 12 hours a night it may lower her hormone levels because it will trick her into thinking it's winter, aka not breeding season.

This worked very well for our birds and it stopped our female from laying a bazillion eggs like she usually did.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've discussed the pros and cons with a vet about the hormone medication Lupron. Its side effects are alarming not to mention it is expensive when I can do the modifications with light reduction and so on.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How many hours a night do you cover her cage? If you keep her cage covered for at least 12 hours a night it may lower her hormone levels because it will trick her into thinking it's winter, aka not breeding season.

This worked very well for our birds and it stopped our female from laying a bazillion eggs like she usually did.
Thank you! I've been reducing the amount of light. It's hard sometimes because she (like almost all other birds) is an incredibly light sleeper. I don't like to put her in another room to sleep, but I have been because her health is important.
 

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You can put her cage in a dark closet, that way no lights or sounds disrupt her. It would make the long nights easier on the both of you. Having a separate sleep cage works well too.
 
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