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So I found out at an animal shelter near me brought in a cockatiel and I really want him!!! I visited him too and he's super cute, a little skittish and super pretty.

Problem is I have a female cockatiel and while i really want to take him in, I'm worried about putting them in the same cage.

Perhaps I could somehow find a spot for another cage in my room, have them socialize when they're outside but? I'm not too sure. It would be way more convenient if i could put them in the same cage when they're used to each other and not worry about extra cockatiels being reproduced :,)

what do you guys think? Should I take him in anyways or just find another cockatiel thats female?
 

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Are you able to buy a new cage? If so, what's your budget? You could put them in separate cages but next to eachother (after a vet check & quarantine period) so they can still socialize and interact but can't engage in any spring-time activities. A friend of mine has a double flight cage (cost her around $280) that has a divider in the middle so she can keep her boy and girl separate without having two separate cages.

Also it IS possible to have a male and female together without them breeding, i've done it many times. If I don't give them a nestbox (or anything else that resembles an acceptable nesting site) they generally don't breed. I do find it easier to just have them caged separately though.
 

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Starting them off in their own cages is a really good idea, not just to prevent mating but because it gives them a chance to get to know one another. Imagine if someone took a stranger you didn't know and moved them into your room all of a sudden and expected you to just deal with them. It will also help you bond with the new bird.

Hormone control kept my birds from breeding when I didn't want them to so it's definitely doable.
 

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I agree with everyone on this thread, a new cage would be your best option! :)
 

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I had mixed gender budgies for years and never had a baby budgie. There are things you can do to keep them from feeling like now is the time to lay, to the point where Nouba, my female, laid unfertilized eggs even with three males in the cage with her. I have a female tiel (Trinket) and we just rescued a male (Kade). They're separated right now for quarantine and so I can bond with Kade. They will be in separate cages near each other for quite a while when the quarantine is over and then there going in together. Mainly because Trinkets cage is a HUGE flight cage and I have a tiny house.

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If you're planning on putting them together, it might work to get a smaller, less expensive cage as a temporary cage, and then you'll have a nice quarantine cage or a smaller cage in case they get injured or sick or a travel cage. However, if you can't cage them together for any reason (i.e. if they fight), you should be prepared to get a bigger one; bigger cage = happier bird (for the most part).
 

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Like everybody else, you really need another cage. The new bird will be stressed because their entire life will be uprooted and changed. Plus a bird can be territorial of their existing cage, although I've seen this more with my males than my single female. (though apparently my one boy might be a girl.. go figure.)

If you do adopt them, it would be a really kind gesture. Just be sure you have the time and resources available for another bird. Plus, it's a good idea to take them to a vet for a check up.

Another thing is diet. If your one birdie eats pellets, and the new one eats seeds, it'll take some time getting the new one to convert to pellets.
 

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Another thing is diet. If your one birdie eats pellets, and the new one eats seeds, it'll take some time getting the new one to convert to pellets.
Variety is the spice of life. Cockatiels are predominately seed eaters in the wild, so they need about 50% seed and pellets, and as many fruits/veggies as you can get them to eat. Nutritionally, a balance of all of these makes the healthiest cockatiel, and also the one who's going to live the longest. With just pellets, they're missing out on the nutrients needed from fruits/veggies (though mostly veggies) and seeds (both mature and sprouted). The same goes for if you gave them only seed, or only fruits or only veggies. They need a balance of all of them. It's something I love about birds, how specialized they are.
 
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