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Discussion Starter #1
My lutino cockatiel, Binkie, loves water. He bathes at least every other day, if not more. But these days, we find him sat in his water bowl at least 3 times a day, even if he's already had a proper bath in a spacious container where he can splash about and stuff.
He acts happy, he just happily chirps while he sits in his water bowl. I'm just worried that something might be wrong which is making him bathe so much more often.
Maybe a change in the weather?
 

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Is it warmer there? That could be the cause. Or he just really likes water lol.
 

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Every other day doesn't seem excessive to me, in fact if the weather is warm and water is available I suspect some birds will bath almost every day.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Roxy Culver: its actually all the opposite, this happened as the weather went from sun and 25 degrees C to rain and wind. I'm thinking the sudden appearance of rain is stimulating his bathing instincts?
Ghosth:: Im just worried that hes trying to get in the water 3 or 4 times a day now rather than every other day!
enigma731: Maybe Binkie thinks so too. But then our other tiel hates water! It's so bizarre.
 

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I swear the one cockatiel, Mindwipe, thinks she's part conure some days. She's very much in the water bowl, splashing about :D

Sounds as if you have your own water baby there!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've been doing some more research and it seems it's hormonal behavior. It's summer, the daylight hours are longer and I reckon Binkie is sexually mature at this point (we're not very sure of his age as we bought him off another family who was very ambiguous about it), so he's wanting to mate.
Apparently I should avoid letting him bathe for a week or 2, so I'll go ahead and do that :) Thanks for all the responses though!
 

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I have never heard of that being a hormonal behavior so I am questioning the research you found. You won't be able to stop him from bathing in his water bowl bc you can't take his water source away. Also, we have hormone reduction techniques if you are convinced that what it is. But that all sounds wrong to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You have a point, however I've searched everywhere and the only place where I DID find anything relating to Binkie's specific behavior (and it did describe it to a T) said it was due to hormones and wanting to mate. I'm not going to take his water bowl away, of course, but I won't give him a bath to splash about in for a little bit, and I'm going to change his sleeping hours and move his toys around for a bit to make him feel less confused if that's the issue.
If not I'll have to ask an avian vet. It seems something small but tiels are pretty good at hiding illness and if it's not hormones i'm scared he might have some discomfort with his skin or feathers.
 

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I also have never heard of this behavior being related to hormones. The fact that an explanation makes sense does not make it accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
mm. I think i might be getting the cause and effect wrong in that case. Or maybe i'm just completely off-track. I think I might've misunderstood the article ): Guess i'll have to keep on looking.
I get pretty worried about these things so i was pretty desperate for a solution. I may or may not have jumped to conclusions a bit fast.
 

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Hens will bathe once they've had eggs to help the eggs have moisture BUT tiels wont do that if there are no eggs to sit on wet. SO, I don't think this is related to hormonal behavior, but doing hormone reduction techniques wont hurt.
 

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I am wondering if he is bathing more often due to dry/itchy skin? However, bathing often is usually done to avoid this.

I found this:

Many birds are molting during the fall and winter months of the year. Often when the heat is turned on in our homes, it can cause a prolonged molt as well as some dry itchy skin on many birds as the heat dries the air out. Since cockatiels tend to have a lot of feather dust anyway, winter can seem to add even more dust from them as their feathers can become dryer and in turn seem increase the amount of feather dust.

Dry itchy skin is caused more often in the winter months due to inside heat drying the air out. This can in turn sometimes cause birds to over-preen the feathers or even pull some out as they try and relieve the itchiness. If you have ever had a bad case of dry itchy skin in the winter I'm sure you can relate to the uncomfortable feeling.

Adding a cool mist humidifier to your bird's room, or even a small tabletop water fountain can help in adding much needed moisture back into your bird's environment.

http://parrotpressnews.blogspot.com.au/2011/02/cockatiel-with-dry-itchy-skin.html
I wonder if it is due to lack of mositure in the environment making him itchy, hence needing to bath more. I am really not sure, it could after all be that he just enjoys bathing, they are quite dusty.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks, Solace, that's actually really comforting to know! I live in holland so the weather can go to soaky downpours to desertic dry temperature in the course of a few days, maybe that's causing Binkie some discomfort. I'll see to it that he gets more moisture and baths :D
 
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