Talk Cockatiels Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, my name is Molly and I am new to the forum. I brought home my very first baby cockatiel just this morning and am so excited for this journey! He/she is about 9 weeks old. She (I have been calling her she even though it is too soon to tell) is fully weaned but still enjoys a tiny bit of formula since she is the runt of the group and it is fun to help with bonding. She has been hand fed since about 1 week old (parent raised for the first week on accident) and seems to be settling in nicely. I am looking forward to learning from you all! Any tips to helping her settle in and bond would be appreciated! Thanks :)
Maggie.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Welcome! Do you have an avian vet all set up for him/her? Do you have a name? If possible, I would work on the command 'step up' since that will become super useful, and I tip I learned from an African Grey owner;

When you are going to do something to the bird, it's best to 'warn' them whenever possible. Don't suddenly touch them or move them or do something you know will be alarming to them, use a word or action to communicate. For example, if I want to offer scratches to Older Birb or Younger Birb, I will say 'Scratch? Scratch?' and do a particular finger gesture. If it gets a response in the positive, I can offer scratches with less chance of being bitten or simply the animal running off. If I get no response or a hostile one (Younger Birb is parent reared and isn't hand-friendly lol but she let me scratch her recently!) then I know not to go ahead. Same with some other things I know might confuse or frighten them like moving their entire cage to hoover it; for that I go with 'You ready? Ready?' that way they know to brace for something happening. Likewise I use reassuring words if something happens like fireworks, or use codewords. Believe it or not, I had to reassure them when I first moved to this area that the huge vehicles they could suddenly see out the window weren't a danger!

You'll also find you'll probably have some words or rituals that are just for you and your birb that don't make sense to anyone else, but it's a nice thing between the two of you. For example, Older Birb makes a little noise when she's yawning, and I like to say 'ooo yawny birb' or a single whistle back to her. It hasn't caught on with Younger Birb, who doesn't make the noise!

TOYS TOYS TOYS! Find out what toys your bean likes! I thought my birds didn't like toys for years as a baby owner, but realised it was paper and shredding toys my pair needed, and man do they LOVE shredding toys! Experiment, find out what your birds do and don't like!

Make sure to keep a good mix of perch types and widths to exercise your beans feet!

Try all sorts of SAFE fruits and veg with your birb, but please do not be surprised if they don't like fruit; cockatiels seem to be pretty notorious for not liking fruit much, if at all (no cockatiel I've owned ever liked fruit for more than one experimental bite. Younger Birb outright thinks raspberries are scary) but they should be good to try vegetables such as broccoli and carrots. Look up sprouting for parrots as well, gotta love your sprouts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Welcome! Do you have an avian vet all set up for him/her? Do you have a name? If possible, I would work on the command 'step up' since that will become super useful, and I tip I learned from an African Grey owner;

When you are going to do something to the bird, it's best to 'warn' them whenever possible. Don't suddenly touch them or move them or do something you know will be alarming to them, use a word or action to communicate. For example, if I want to offer scratches to Older Birb or Younger Birb, I will say 'Scratch? Scratch?' and do a particular finger gesture. If it gets a response in the positive, I can offer scratches with less chance of being bitten or simply the animal running off. If I get no response or a hostile one (Younger Birb is parent reared and isn't hand-friendly lol but she let me scratch her recently!) then I know not to go ahead. Same with some other things I know might confuse or frighten them like moving their entire cage to hoover it; for that I go with 'You ready? Ready?' that way they know to brace for something happening. Likewise I use reassuring words if something happens like fireworks, or use codewords. Believe it or not, I had to reassure them when I first moved to this area that the huge vehicles they could suddenly see out the window weren't a danger!

You'll also find you'll probably have some words or rituals that are just for you and your birb that don't make sense to anyone else, but it's a nice thing between the two of you. For example, Older Birb makes a little noise when she's yawning, and I like to say 'ooo yawny birb' or a single whistle back to her. It hasn't caught on with Younger Birb, who doesn't make the noise!

TOYS TOYS TOYS! Find out what toys your bean likes! I thought my birds didn't like toys for years as a baby owner, but realised it was paper and shredding toys my pair needed, and man do they LOVE shredding toys! Experiment, find out what your birds do and don't like!

Make sure to keep a good mix of perch types and widths to exercise your beans feet!

Try all sorts of SAFE fruits and veg with your birb, but please do not be surprised if they don't like fruit; cockatiels seem to be pretty notorious for not liking fruit much, if at all (no cockatiel I've owned ever liked fruit for more than one experimental bite. Younger Birb outright thinks raspberries are scary) but they should be good to try vegetables such as broccoli and carrots. Look up sprouting for parrots as well, gotta love your sprouts!
Wow! Thank you so much for taking the time to share so much information with me! Yes, I have found an avian vet for her! We are moving later this week and the vet is in our new town- so excited to have found an avian vet in a small town! Baby bird is not sex confirmed but we chose the name Maggie and have been calling baby a she... but we shall see! Hahah 50/50 chance. Today she spent quite a bit of time out of her enclosure and we worked on "step up" and "shoulder". She will also give kisses for more millet :ROFLMAO: I have been talking to her, reading to her, and sitting near her cage too. She was too nervous to go to the food bowls on the bottom of the cage (where the breeder had them) so I got her a hanging food bowl today andddddd that is her new favorite place. She had a few squirts of formula this morning and has been eating solids the rest of the day. She really likes brown rice, shredded carrot, parsley, spinach, and cilantro thus far. She has also picked at whole wheat pasta, red bell pepper, and mango. Bits of rice cake are popular too. This afternoon she was squawking like she wanted more formula but she did not take any when I offered it but she now wants head pets constantly haha she is sooo sweet!!
As for perches, she has a flat perch that she likes to stand on to eat, a natural wider branch, a swing, and a rope perch. She likes toys with shredded colored paper and a wreath made of little balls with a bell in the center. No interest in destructive/ chewing toys yet. She does nibble at her cuttlebone too. I am having a great time getting to know her.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top