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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a lone male tiel in a large aviary cage. He was purchased from a pet store where he lived in a large aviary with other birds.
He has bonded with me over the past 3 months after work & on weekends to the point where he preens me, but never played with his toys. He would just climb & sing all day.

This week I placed a large metal mirror in his cage near his toys, and the improvements are AMAZING!

He is chewing all his shreddable toys he barely touched before, and is literally hopping in circles with happiness outside of his cage.

I feel bad for not buying a mirror sooner, and sensory depriving the little guy during the daytime for 3 months.

Therefore I highly recommend any new owners ignore the bad advice of mirrors being "psychologically damaging" & radically improve their tiel's psychological wellbeing by purchasing a mirror.

It has moved my bird from a state of constant weariness & barely getting by to 100% happiness where he feels safe in a flock all of the time.
 

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It is fantastic that your little guy has shown so much improvement! It's amazing to see them thrive, isn't it? It just makes you feel so good to see them happy.

I think the biggest thing that prevents people from giving their single tiels a mirror, is because they hear that the bird will bond with the bird in the mirror rather than with the person. It DOES happen (i've had it happen), and that bond can result in aggressive behaviour. My mirror-bonded bird only got mildly possessive and aggressive, but I have seen it much worse. It doesn't happen with EVERY bird (I also had a bird that ignored his mirror entirely), but it's a genuine thing.

I think it is important for a bird to have some sort of companion if he/she has come from an aviary or multi-bird setting, particularly if his/her new human works during the day and the bird is left alone (which is NOT a reason not to get a bird in my opinion, we all gotta work!). In those cases I like to see people get two birds to keep eachother company during the time they are alone, and as you've discovered, a mirror can have the desired effect with the bird not feeling so alone. Having different birds in different cages can help, too, such as budgies.

Just having *someone* there, whether it be another tiel, a different species or their own reflection, can offer a lot of comfort to a lone bird. They are flock animals, after all!
 
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