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Hi, long story short my husband bought 2 cockatiels about a year ago and thought one F one M we soon realised both were female as the male started laying eggs. Fast forward 6months he bought another 2 'males'. Im the one home mostly and handling them and im fairly confident he got jibbed again as one of the new birds has become aggresive and will not allow our original females near the nesting boxes (which im concerned about as ive seen one new and one of our F mating several times). This aggressive cockatiel will also not eat or drink with the others. My question is should i Have separated the cockatiel behaving aggresively? I did today and 'she' seemed stressed. I took her out and allowed one on one time with me and open cage time and have since moved her over near the others but in her own cage, and she seems much more content. Was this the right thing to do? ( please note second 2 were avairy birds, the one i have removed as believe female is still getting used to me but will happily sit on shoulder whilst im doing things around the house). Hope this all makes sense, hubby threw me in the deep in.馃槵
 

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Separating the aggressor but letting "her" stay near the rest of the flock was the right thing to do. Cockatiels are territorial about nestboxes, and it sounds like "she" was trying to claim the nestbox for herself. But the males are usually more aggressive about defending the nest than females are, so "she" might actually be a "he". They can claim a nest without actually having a mate, so it doesn't prove anything about gender if "he" hasn't paired up with a hen. What does this bird look like? With some mutations you can tell the sex of an adult bird just by looking at it, and with other mutations you can't.

Don't give anyone a nestbox unless you want to have babies.
 

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Separating the aggressor but letting "her" stay near the rest of the flock was the right thing to do. Cockatiels are territorial about nestboxes, and it sounds like "she" was trying to claim the nestbox for herself. But the males are usually more aggressive about defending the nest than females are, so "she" might actually be a "he". They can claim a nest without actually having a mate, so it doesn't prove anything about gender if "he" hasn't paired up with a hen. What does this bird look like? With some mutations you can tell the sex of an adult bird just by looking at it, and with other mutations you can't.

Don't give anyone a nestbox unless you want to have babies.
Thank you for that馃槉. Ill post a pic in the morning but mostly grey with with white fleck,yellow/grey face and bright orange cheeks.
I dont really want to breed them just yet as so new and feel have too much to learn in short time frame its my husband whos keen to breed.
Saying that as mentioned above 2 have bonded (although male is young so wasnt expecting him to bind at all ) so im worrried if i take nest boxes out they will lay anyway? Should they stay or should they go? And do i reintroduce the aggresive one once nestboxes are gone?
Sorry for all the questions馃槙
 

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Take the nestboxes out if you aren't ready to breed. Young birds are like human teenagers - they get the urge to breed before they have the maturity to be good parents, so it's best to wait until they're old enough to handle the responsibilities. You can allow some mixing between the aggressive bird and the others to see whether they can coexist peacefully, and make a decision based on what happens. Here's an article on natural hormone control with techniques that may help reduce aggression and prevent egg laying: http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-hormones.html
 
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