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Discussion Starter #1
... that can be done once the follicles are damaged through plucking? Even if it takes a long time? :(
I was just wondering because my boy is lively and agile, but as he grows older he might become clumsier and that fragile naked neck breaks my heart...
It looks soooooo small and fragile. :(
 

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I don't think there is. But I also don't think it's actually a risk as far as hurting his neck. Feathers are most important for thermoregulation, and I don't think they provide much protection from injuries -- which sounds depressing, but my point is that I don't think your guy is in any more danger than tiels who don't pluck. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't think there is. But I also don't think it's actually a risk as far as hurting his neck. Feathers are most important for thermoregulation, and I don't think they provide much protection from injuries -- which sounds depressing, but my point is that I don't think your guy is in any more danger than tiels who don't pluck. :)
Thank you. :)
 

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You could also consider getting a soft collar to go around his neck. Some birds actually find them comforting to wear, but others hate them, so you'll have to judge whether that's a good idea for your guy or not. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
You could also consider getting a soft collar to go around his neck. Some birds actually find them comforting to wear, but others hate them, so you'll have to judge whether that's a good idea for your guy or not. :)
I had made one, but could not put it around his neck by myself. The breeder then said she tried, but he took it off in a few seconds. :(
It had velcro to close it. Maybe velcro is not strong enough for a strong boy. I had bookmarked a collar I liked online. Again I thought postage was very high for something that can be put in a normal envelope, but I guess sellers want some sort of protection like signature etc., particularly when they send something overseas? The collar was a very reasonable price, but postage was about 150% of the price of the collar.
I want to go to the vet again before Christmas and want to ask her if they have collars at the clinic. But it must be soft. I would never put anything hard around his neck.
Otherwise he might get the one from overseas for Christmas (from his Santa Claus mum), but I then would have to go to the vet again to put it on...
Anyway, here are a couple of recent photos, so you can see the problem...
PS: Yes, there is a blanket on the bookshelf because he loves chewing in particular the books on that bookshelf...
 

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It may be something you have to work on with him gradually. Check out some of the threads/resources on harness training. It would be best to get him used to the collar the same way you would with a harness, so that putting it on him isn't an ordeal. But again, this is only if you really feel it's necessary. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It may be something you have to work on with him gradually. Check out some of the threads/resources on harness training. It would be best to get him used to the collar the same way you would with a harness, so that putting it on him isn't an ordeal. But again, this is only if you really feel it's necessary. :)
It is a bit problematic for me to do it by myself because I have small hands and he is super lively. But I will discuss the issue with the vet. Maybe she won't charge so much to just put it on and take it off until he gets used to it. I think he can get used to it. He often protests when he doesn't like something (like going to bed), but then he adapts... :)
 

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I'm sure he can get used to it too. Try to help him make positive associations with the collar, so do things like giving him treats and attention when he wears it. :)
 

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I've heard that with some birds who pluck, flapping exercises can stimulate follicle growth again. The story I hear was about a green wing macaw (?) who had plucked for years on his wings and daily exercises of the flapping game caused the feathers to regrow. The bird essentially sat on his owner's arm and the arm was lowered fast enough to cause the bird to flap but not fall off. This was done a few times at first then more often as the bird developed stamina.

Good luck with whatever you try! My Windblade is a bald darling in her neck and chest area. Whatever you try I may try with her :)
 

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Hmm...I'm not sure what the mechanism for that would be, but it is an interesting story. I'm also curious to hear about any other approaches. I never did try putting my plucker on psych meds, but that's an option I have discussed with my vet that seems to work for some birds. We talked about using amitriptyline, since it's used in humans to treat both anxiety and neuropathy. I opted not to do it because I felt that medicating her every day would reduce her quality of life given that she's terrified of being restrained due to being abused as a baby. But it might be an option for other birds!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The rescue I work with has had really good luck with this spray, but it didn't work for Odette.
I don't think they have anything like that here.

I think I will email that pet shop I linked to to ask them if it can be dangerous if it gets into his eyes. Just to be sure. It could help, who knows. Once he starts to associate plucking with bad taste he might stop.
 
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