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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone actually weaned a baby a week or 2 early, and is it harmful to the baby to do so?
 

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it is probably not a good idea. i would keep the bird fed well for a little while longer rather then earlier..
 

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We've had it on here but for those two weeks you should still offer the syringe just in case the baby still wants it. Every bird is different so it is possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok...that's a good thing to remember, as I have a 4 week old baby that seems quite interested in pecking and chewing at stuff already, she was chewing my phone case just a moment ago, just wondered weather it's possible, but I'll be playing it safe just in case.
 

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Four weeks is too young in ANY book. She'll peck at stuff but you still need to feed her formula. Four weeks is when they're just discovering food so there's no way she's weaned yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I know she's not weaned, just wondered if it was possible, I have no intention on weaning her early if it's NOT a good idea...
 

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The earliest ever to wean would probably be 6 weeks...but i still find that risky so i would prefer feeding until i thought they could maintain their weight eating on their own.
 

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I have had babies eating seed and refusing the pipette at 6 to 7 weeks. But that was the babies choice. Never force a baby to ween, let them decide.
 

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my 7 week old is refusing most his formula - i still offer and will continue to do so until he refuses at least 4 meals in a row.

He started pecking only a short while back so its possilble yours may wean early - but you never know....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't want to force them so I will still feed them the formula but let them investigate other foods only when they are old enough as I don't want them to wean themselves if they still need some of the goodness out of the formula.
 

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Their immune systems are not fully developed until they are at least 3 months old. weaning a bird early is just short changing them on fully developing immunity, which can make them more prone to secondary problems relating to stress.

since your bird has an interest in nibbling on things keep some millet and seed scattered on the cage/container floor and right before you handfeed it place your finger at the base of the crop. if you feel food in there feed less formula than what you would normally feed per feeding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
But doing that would wean them early wouldnt it( if they did take an interest to the millet)?

Oh well, I'm just going to keep feeding them the formula until theyre ready.
 

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Giving them the millet and seed on the ground will just guide them in the right direction. I had 4 chicks that we raised this last year. From 3 different clutches. The first weaned at 6 weeks. The second at 7 and a half weeks. The last two were 7 and 8 weeks. They were all nibbling and exploring at 4 weeks though. They wean when they are ready if you let them make that choice. You are just giving them the opportunity to learn what they need to learn. They will learn it when they are ready. :) From everything I have learned since then.. I will still continue to give them the opportunity when they get curious.. but by no means get concerned when not weaned at 6, 7 or even 8 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Okay, well I took your advice and put down some egg/biscuit mix and some seed as I don't have any millet sprays at the moment,

I'm just worried that they won't except the syringe afterwards though...
 

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I'm just worried that they won't except the syringe afterwards though...
If they're hungry they'll accept it.

You can teach them to eat formula off a spoon. My babies reach a point where they don't want to be restrained for feeding and don't want the syringe and that's my signal to break out the spoon. At first I have to shove it in their beak to get them to taste it, but once they figure out that it's yummy formula they're quite happy to eat from the spoon.
 
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