Talk Cockatiels Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK so I have some interesting feathers from a friend of mine. These are from a normal pearl male. His feathers have a greenish tint to them and we were wondering if this meant anything.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,985 Posts
Can't help, but that's interesting, it's almost like he wants to be cinnamon. Maybe he's split to cinnamon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,086 Posts
I have sort of a similar question, so I hope it's okay to post it here. I've recently noticed that a few of Sunny's feathers in his white wing bar have a yellowish sheen to them, only in sunlight. My first reaction was to panic over it being due to liver issues, but it's SO slight that I can't even take a pic of it accurately -- it really is a sheen, not the actual feather's color.

Is this mutation related? As far as I know, Sunny is split pied and possibly white face. His parents were lutino and cinnamon, and although his eyes don't reflect wine colored, he does have a few stray cinnamon-looking feathers.

I don't want to thread-jack, so if you guys want me to start a separate thread, then I will. I just thought we might address these questions together since Sunny's white feathers have a similar look to the grey feathers you're posting. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
Singerboy has some yellowish feathers like this and he is split to pearl. i always thought that it was that... Good luck!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Singerboy has some yellowish feathers like this and he is split to pearl.
Its not yellowish, this is a greenish color.

Is this mutation related? As far as I know, Sunny is split pied and possibly white face. His parents were lutino and cinnamon, and although his eyes don't reflect wine colored, he does have a few stray cinnamon-looking feathers.
Enigma, its along the same lines so technically its not thread-jacking at all!:D I'm suspecting emerald but this bird is also split to cinnamon as well (mother was a visual cinnamon) SO that could be what this is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
I have sort of a similar question, so I hope it's okay to post it here. I've recently noticed that a few of Sunny's feathers in his white wing bar have a yellowish sheen to them, only in sunlight. My first reaction was to panic over it being due to liver issues, but it's SO slight that I can't even take a pic of it accurately -- it really is a sheen, not the actual feather's color.
That's from high levels of something..that's what Susanne said on an old thread--it causes yellow pigmentation to be seen on the wing bars. Luna had it when he was younger. I don't really think it's caused by anything though.

I searched up and down the forum for the word..hypochrome, lipochrome, melanin. I couldn't find it! So I give up looking. Maybe we can ask her. I feel like it was hypo-something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,597 Posts
I said yellowish.. I mean that his feathers look a bit like that. i always pointed it to the fact that he is split to pearl..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i always pointed it to the fact that he is split to pearl..
Which could be why his are yellowish...this is a visual pearl male so I don't think that's the case here.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,909 Posts
The color factor that controls the yellow and red pigment is usually called psittacins. I think Susanne calls it lipochrome, but according to Wikipedia at least it's not really the same thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipochrome

Wikipedia doesn't have a separate entry on psittacins, but from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_budgerigar_mutation :

"The chemical nature of the yellow pigment in budgerigars and other psittacidae is unknown[1], and in the absence of a chemical name George A Smith coined the term "psittacins" to cover the yellow, orange and red pigments found in parrots and parrot-like birds. Psittacins impart a far more constant intensity of colour to feathers than do the more commonly found carotenoid pigments such as xanthophyll, the yellow pigment found in the canary. "

Cockatiels have only two color factors (melanin and psittacins) so every color effect on a cockatiel is somehow related to one or both of these pigments, unless it's something related to the feather structure. The green color in most parrots isn't caused by a pigment; it's an optical illusion related to the structure of the feather and the way it reflects light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,086 Posts
Roxy, I looked closer at Sunny's tail feathers tonight after seeing this post, and he has a similar coloration going on with a couple of them up near the top. It's not as pronounced as in your pics, but it's there. I'm pretty sure he's too old to have any emerald in him, so I'm leaning toward it being related to the cinnamon, at least in his case.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would have to agree in this bird's case as well, since he for sure is split cinnamon, it would make sense.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,086 Posts
I am still curious about the yellow sheen to the wing bar feathers, though. It's so subtle that I honestly can't say whether it's always been that way or not. It doesn't look like any pics I've seen of disease or hormonal changes, though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Hi....this is what I just emailed to her about his feathers.
-------------------------
Since he is split to Cinn, which can have a high lipochrome (yellow) content and he is also pearl I have seen that happen to some of my birds over the years. The melanin is not completely masking the lipochrome colors, which is unusual because it is the melanin that totally masks all the pearls on a male after he molts....in essence they are not gone just covered over. Sooo....since the melanin is not totally masking this yellow, he is going to be like my Noodles and may even molt in a pearl, which interestingly it may be a cinnamon pearl not a normal pearl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Enigma....the yellow sheen to the wing bar is termed 'Acquired Color' and it may be a result of splits he is carrying, such as pied or any mutation that has a higher content of lipochrome. The 'acquired' means that he did not have this showing when he feathered but with age and successive molts this color appeared.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Singerboy has some yellowish feathers like this and he is split to pearl.
Its not yellowish, this is a greenish color.

----------------------------

OK....in regards to the green illusion and Emerald...it is just that an illusion.

Visualize splatter painting with an airbrush some yellow on a piece of paper and then going back over it with some grey, and a tiny amount of black. Stand back from this and it will appear a drab olive green. This is the distribution of pigments on an Emerald that gives the illusion of grey. If the feathers were magnified 200-400 times the granules of pigment would be visible.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Visualize splatter painting with an airbrush some yellow on a piece of paper and then going back over it with some grey, and a tiny amount of black
That makes sense. I wandered how it came to look greenish. So a split cinnamon mixed with pearl can cause this? That's good to know!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Since I don't have anymore Em, or their feathers I opened up Paintshop Pro to try and do an illustration. I started with a grey ground, and then used the airbrush tool (set low density and opacity) to add the yellow and dark charcoal grey pigments. I almost looks like the pigment distribution that is on a EM. For the bird in the original post the background color would be a dark grey with a fine yellow and charcoal distribution of pigments....like pix 2 Pix 3 shows the Painshop illus with some closups of Emerald feathers.
 

Attachments

1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top