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I just got a albino male today and i have Ivory so next year I will breed them cause the male is only 6 months old and I pray that he is a male cause the lady wasn't for sure!!! She did pelvic bone sexing that she has done for 14 years and it has worked!!! So pray!!!:D
 

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Did you ask what the parents were? If the breeder knows her stuff she knows that some combinations only produce female albinos (whiteface Lutinos). If the mother didn't wasn't a Lutino split for whiteface or an albino. It would be a girl. I hope you either got that info or you have a way to contact her.
 

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I'm glad someone else brought up the negative side to breeding Whiteface Lutinos together. While you are guaranteed Whiteface Lutino chicks, you pay a very high price for it. Some of the genetic defects of breeding Whiteface Lutinos together can be poor eyesight, increased night frights, bald spot on the back of the head, high risk of overall poor health.

When breeding, we also have to take into consideration how the pairing will affect the future of the species/mutation. As breeders, our main goal should be to produce healthy, high quality birds. :)

If he is a male, you'd be better off pairing him with a normal Whiteface, which would still give you Whiteface Lutino chicks (female) and Whiteface split to Lutino males. Then, if you so desired, you could take one of the male chicks and breed him with your female Whiteface Lutino that you have now. That would give you two pairs that produce Whiteface Lutinos. Just something to consider. ;)
 

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That's been mentioned in several threads by crazy4. I hope she will see this one too and realize that there are ways to go about it without crossing those two directly which would result in bald birds. One of them is bald already and the fact that one of them isn't doesn't mean you will be rid of the gene. It's aweakness in the Lutino mutation due to lots of interbreeding to establish the breed. The only reason Ivory isn't bald is because she probably came from a Whiteface Father that was split to Lutino and a Whiteface Mother.
 

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the bald spot discussion is more for SHOW birds, not pet birds

but in order to get rid of the bald spot - the birds have to be bred - BUT with selective lutino pairs, people have been working on it for years, and there are lutinos with out bald spots because of it

yes the bald spot came from inbreeding, but it is also being bred out of them - it just takes time

So if the birds aren't for show - why stress the point, I'm sure the original poster is still going to love the babies rather they have a bald spot or not

but the only way to get rid of the lutino bald spot is to breed lutinos Perhaps with a smaller bald spot to eventually get it gone, I'm no expert just what I've been reading.
 

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Ok I'm very concerned about the attitude here. Why take the lazy way at the health of the future chicks? That seems very cruel to me. And selfish.

Show birds and physical flaws aside, why would we intentionally create new life without giving them the best chance possible? The lifespan could be shortened to half. They could be deaf. The list goes on.

The male ended up with a bald spot because he was the result of this same type of breeding. How in the world is it going to help things to add one more generation of this same mistake? The chicks will be worse off than the dad.

And what is the goal here? Will the babies be sold as pets? Why would somebody choose them over a better example of the species? Well I guess they could be labeled as miniature vultures. One could make a fortune.

Ok that was harsh but seriously the goal when breeding should be to improve anywhere you can and produce birds that can be healthy and happy.

I saw a quote not too long ago that really hits home. "With breeding should come such a heavy sense of responsibility that it keeps you up at night"
 

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I agree even to breed them to be sold as pets. A bald bird will be harder to sell. If that is the goal it just seems to make sense to me to work towards the best result. Mind you I don't split up a pair that has bonded just because they may not produce desirable young. But I attempt to make available the best matches in the hopes that they will choose well.
 

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Yes, I'm a firm believer in the future of the species. Show or pet quality Cockatiels, it doesn't much matter. The reasons why Lutinos have bald spots is because people keep breeding the ones with the bald spots.

The first Lutinos brought to the US did NOT have bald spots. Neither did their offspring. It wasn't until they were sold off from the original owner and the buyers started to get greedy and starting breeding Lutino to Lutino. That is when the bald spot came in (or so I was told by a breeder who saw the original Lutinos brought into the States).

If breeders are working so hard to get rid of the bald spot, why in the world would someone want to bring it back in? To me that makes no sense. The only way to get rid of a Lutino with a bald spot is to stop breeding the birds that have it.
 

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I'm not a breeder, but I have to agree.

I've seen first-hand the results of the well-meaning breeding of animals with known defects as pets (in that case it was far more serious - people were breeding attractive animals despite their genes being almost universally lethal), and just because you intend them to be pets doesn't mean the people you sell them to won't end up breeding with the bird themselves, producing still more birds prone to bald spots, and passing them on to still more people who will do the same.

If the bald patches are the result of lax breeding practices, I see no reason to continue on with the line, knowing the birds come from stock that was improperly selected and bred.
 

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i'm straddling the fence...last time i jumped over the side i got attacked by wolves lol.....but i have to say that i would listen to the people in this post due to the accumulated experience they have......and of course that everyone is thinking of whats best for the birds...and future birds....the most important thing a breeder should do i feel
 

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If breeders are working so hard to get rid of the bald spot, why in the world would someone want to bring it back in? To me that makes no sense. The only way to get rid of a Lutino with a bald spot is to stop breeding the birds that have it.
Exactly. It's pointless to try and stop it all together if people are going to keep doing it. It'll only make it harder then it already is.

I wouldn't do it, especially knowing that there's people trying to stop it, carrying on and doing it just shows you would rather keep it going rather then stop it. (I thought most bird lovers would want that)
 

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It's pointless to try and stop it all together if people are going to keep doing it. It'll only make it harder then it already is.
I have to respectively disagree with that. That is like saying it's pointless to stop bringing in wild caught birds into the USA/Canada simply because other countries still do it. I tend to think this way...just because my next door neighbour is doing it, or everyone on the block is doing it, it doesn't mean it's right.

I can tell you that the top cockatiel breeders do NOT breed Lutinos with bald spots. They are working hard to stop it. The people that are breeding the Lutinos with bald spots are the ones who aren't educated enough to know how bad it is, or they simply don't care about the future of the species. And if that is the case, then, in my opinion, they shouldn't be breeding.

It's all about education. :)
 

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i do have a question in regards to this...is the problem only when breeding two lutinos together.....or can a lutino with a bald spot be bred with a non-lutino? and not pass on the blad gene? its probably an obvious answer which i will go duhhhhhh about later but i figure better to ask then assume because we all know what assuming does....;)
 

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If a Lutino male is bred to a non Lutino female all the female offspring will be Lutino and it's much less likely to have the bald spot. Even a male who just carries the Lutino split will produce some Lutino babies then that risk is even further reduced.
 

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I have three tiels with bald spots. Gracie is lutino, bred by a bird mill and sold to a pet shop, it's not hard to imagine where she got her bald spot. Bailee's mum was lutino and bred to a pied, he still got the bald spot though it's not as bad as Gracies. Snickers also got the bald spot!! Though again, it's not as bad as his dads.

If it were just the bald spot then there wouldn't be any particular problem breeding lutino to lutino. After all a bald spot is purely superficial. My birds don't have self confidence issues because they don't have a full head of feathers. :p The issue is the other health problems that result from breeding ino to ino, as others have mentioned in this thread.
 

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what about a female lutino bred with a pied male? just in case chico and belle in the distant future decide to pop out some eggies.....we definatly dont want to breed bald birdies....i know there are suppose to be only grey babies from the uion but the males will be split to lutino...does it pass on in the splits?
 
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