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Think of them like x and y chromosomes in humans. Except in reverse. Females are xy and males are xx. Now in this explaination, the sex-linked mutation is carried by the x chromosomes. Since these chromosomes are for all practical purposes reversed in cockatiels hens having an xy genotype cannot be split to sex-linked mutations. Males however, having two x chromosomes can be split and not visual because most of these mutations except for dominant silver are recessive and "overruled" by the other chromosome if it carries normal or a non-congruent mutation.

You need a father bird that is split or visual to those mutations to get some in a clutch that are visual.
 

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In that scenario all of the babies would be Pearl and only the hens would be lutino. If the male were a lutino/Pearl. If you meant split lutino, split Pearl on separate chromosomes then half of the offspring would be Pearl and a portion of the hens would be lutino.

The father will randomly deposit one X chromosome into both sexes in the offspring. The mother only passes her x chromosome to her male offspring usually in the form of a split. This is why the Father's splits and visual mutation ultimately decides what mutations are visual in the offspring with sex linked mutations. The hens mutation only comes into play in deciding if any of those visual birds are male.
 
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