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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How would you go about getting lutino pearl cockatiels? I don't imagine breeding a lutino and a pearl would get lutino pearl babies, but I'm not expert, obviously, and sex linked mutations confuse me.
 

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Think of them like x and y chromosomes in humans. Except in reverse. Females are xy and males are xx. Now in this explaination, the sex-linked mutation is carried by the x chromosomes. Since these chromosomes are for all practical purposes reversed in cockatiels hens having an xy genotype cannot be split to sex-linked mutations. Males however, having two x chromosomes can be split and not visual because most of these mutations except for dominant silver are recessive and "overruled" by the other chromosome if it carries normal or a non-congruent mutation.

You need a father bird that is split or visual to those mutations to get some in a clutch that are visual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Think of them like x and y chromosomes in humans. Except in reverse. Females are xy and males are xx. Now in this explaination, the sex-linked mutation is carried by the x chromosomes. Since these chromosomes are for all practical purposes reversed in cockatiels hens having an xy genotype cannot be split to sex-linked mutations. Males however, having two x chromosomes can be split and not visual because most of these mutations except for dominant silver are recessive and "overruled" by the other chromosome if it carries normal or a non-congruent mutation.

You need a father bird that is split or visual to those mutations to get some in a clutch that are visual.
So the father would need to be split or visual to lutino pearl? If the male were lutino/pearl and the female pearl, would some of the babies be lutino pearl?
 

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In that scenario all of the babies would be Pearl and only the hens would be lutino. If the male were a lutino/Pearl. If you meant split lutino, split Pearl on separate chromosomes then half of the offspring would be Pearl and a portion of the hens would be lutino.

The father will randomly deposit one X chromosome into both sexes in the offspring. The mother only passes her x chromosome to her male offspring usually in the form of a split. This is why the Father's splits and visual mutation ultimately decides what mutations are visual in the offspring with sex linked mutations. The hens mutation only comes into play in deciding if any of those visual birds are male.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In that scenario all of the babies would be Pearl and only the hens would be lutino. If the male were a lutino/Pearl. If you meant split lutino, split Pearl on separate chromosomes then half of the offspring would be Pearl and a portion of the hens would be lutino.

The father will randomly deposit one X chromosome into both sexes in the offspring. The mother only passes her x chromosome to her male offspring usually in the form of a split. This is why the Father's splits and visual mutation ultimately decides what mutations are visual in the offspring with sex linked mutations. The hens mutation only comes into play in deciding if any of those visual birds are male.
I meant if the male was Lutino split for pearl. I might not understand what split means. Does it mean the male is visual lutino, but has the genes for pearl?

What pairing would get lutino pearls in the clutch?
 

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It's absolutely required for father to have the genes for both lutino and pearl to get any lutino pearl chicks at all. He can be visual for both, visual for one and split to the other, or split to both. "Split" means that a bird has one copy of a mutation gene, but two copies are required for the bird to be visual for that mutation. In other words, a bird with a split is carrying the gene for the mutation, but is not visual for the mutation.

When dad gives the genes for both lutino and pearl to one of his daughters, she will be visual lutino pearl. When he gives both of these genes to one of his sons, the results will depend on what color mom is. If she is visual lutino pearl, the son will be visual lutino pearl. If she is not visual for either of these mutations, the son will be split to lutino pearl but will not be visual for either one. If she is visual for one mutation but not the other, the son will be visual for that mutation and split to the other one.

To really understand how this works, you need to understand the inheritance rules for sex-linked mutations. I have an article on it here: http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-sexlinked.html

It may also be helpful to understand how crossovers work. You'll have a better chance of getting a visual lutino pearl baby if dad is visual for both mutations, but a male like this might not be easy to find. If dad is only split to both of these mutations, then crossovers will have an effect on the results. I have an article on it here: http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-crossovers.html
 
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