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Discussion Starter #1
I got my first cockatiel on Wednesday 17th July; it was hand-reared and is now fifteen weeks old, I’m unsure of the gender and colouring. It has the markings of a pearl with yellow feathers on her chest and head.
The reason I’m unsure about the gender is that while the bird has the paler colouring of a female bird, it has began to make whistling noises, as it is reacting to my dad’s older breeding pairs and the local wild birds in my area.
Last year in February, I had a Renal Transplant Operation, so I am on the special anti-rejection drugs, one of which makes my hands shake. Is this likely to create problems, I already know to cover all and any cuts while handing my bird.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

Post some pictures and we can help you with the sexing! With some mutations 'paler' and 'bright' colouring is irrelevant.
 

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How I do it is through Photobucket. Upload them there, edit them/crop them or whatever, then copy and paste the IMG code directly into a post here. It brings up a nice big image like this:

 

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There is a thread here to show you how to upload photos: Uploading Pics
 

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Welcome to the forum:D pictures would definitely be helpful.

All young cockatiels have female colouring until their first molt( between 6-12 months) and that's when males molt in male colouring and females keep their colouring( depending on mutation).
 

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Welcome to the forum. Your tiel is adorable. I'm not good with mutations but I'm going to say your tiel is a pearl pied. Female tiels keep their pearls as they mature and males lose their pearl markings. So that will be an easy way to know if you have a male or female but you'll just have to wait until after the first molt.
 

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Yup, that's a pearl pied (the fish-scale markings are what is referred to as pearls or pearling). Lovely. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for naming the colour, it has helped lots. But the bird is still scared of me and tries to nip me.
I thought being hand-reared and hand trained would have stop that.
 

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I may be new to 'tiel owning, but I have a similar situation. I got Caesar almost two weeks ago and he was hand reared. He was tame too, however, the stress and unfamiliarity of the move made him nervous of us.
He is now back to being hand tame (still not 100%, but it's working)
I basically would sit near the cage as often as possible. I would put my hand in to change food, toys etc and he would hiss and try to bite me. As soon as he stopped doing this as much, I began luring him onto my hand with food.
Because he was hand raised, I have been able to do this much quicker than if he wasn't.
It takes so much time, but it's worth it! :)
 

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Definitely peal pied, and very pretty too :) I would spend a lot of time with him/her before trying to handle them. It can really help just sitting next to them while you go about your daily business
 

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Welcome, you have a lovely bird! My bird is more grey than yours and was pearled:tiel2:. He was more than 6 months old when he started making noises and trying to mimic some words. The only certain way of telling whether a cockatiel is male or female is if they have a genetic test. Males tend to lose their pearls after their first moult, they also tend to be more talkative but this is not always true. some female cockatiels may also whistle a bit. We think our Mo is a male because he has lost his pearling, is beginning to talk, and exhibits some male 'mating' behaviours...;)

I don't see why being on anti rejection drugs will be a problem when handling your cockatiel. I had hand reared cockatiels, and they just needed a little time to get used to me, so I slowly gained their trust getting them used to my hands (slow movements) and positively rewarding them if they were calm with some treats whilst in the cage. Teaching them to step up is the next step and once they do that they should be ready to come out of the cage for a bit. You should be able to find posts/articles to help you with cockatiel training on this website.
 
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