Talk Cockatiels Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
P.S. Same things can be said about the fallow mutation.

Bert maybe we can compare experiences with fallow.

Some of the things I have learned with fallow is to keep it simple. Try to keep the mutation free of other mutation combinations (for lack of a better word)

This is a mutation that benefits from selective breeding of creating bloodlines from a nice quality fallow (with or without a bald spot, but has other positive traits, paired with the best normal grey with no splits (probably the hardest bird to find), or at a minimum split to pied. Start a couple bloodlines and breed the splits together. When there are visual offpring, repeat the above. In otherwords a dedicated breeder will take several years to produce some nice quality fallow. It would be their responcibility to guide future breeders of their stock to breed not for the 'eye candy' but to think to the future and improve succeeding generations.

Some things I have learned when working with fallows is:

1...Pied can improve the head feathering and crest.

2...NEVER breed a cinnamon with a fallow or work with birds that have cinnamon in the background. What happens is that the cinnamon totally masks the fallow color and the offspring look just like a lutino. The only way to tell a fallow cinnamon (the lutino appearing bird) from an lutino is to look at the eye color. And to add to the mutation confusion in knowing what they are a selective bred (several generations for deeper color) cinnamon lutino can be mistaken for a fallow.

3...Avoid introducing pearl into the fallow mutation. Over the last 20 years several breeder of the rarer color mutations have learned that when pearl is bred into the fallow it can contribute to thin feathering behind the crest to huge bald spots.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
This will be interesting ... :)

First things first: in Europe we have two types of fallow birds.
We call them "pale fallow" and "bronze fallow".
Checking my lecture, it is the bronze fallow that exists also in the USA and actually was bred there for the first time (congrats! :D)
It is important to keep in mind that pale fallow differs greatly from bronze fallow, maybe not that much in appearance but surely in the aspects we consider in this topic (baldness, combinations with other mutations, etc.).
So in the following text I consider only the bronze fallow mutation.

Okay, let's first look at your observations.

1...Pied can improve the head feathering and crest.

Actually I never paid attention to the combination of pied with fallow as this combination is rare in Europe.
So thanks a lot for the tip, me and my colleagues will surely pay attention to this feature from now on!

2...NEVER breed a cinnamon with a fallow or work with birds that have cinnamon in the background. What happens is that the cinnamon totally masks the fallow color and the offspring look just like a lutino. The only way to tell a fallow cinnamon (the lutino appearing bird) from an lutino is to look at the eye color. And to add to the mutation confusion in knowing what they are a selective bred (several generations for deeper color) cinnamon lutino can be mistaken for a fallow.

Indeed the combination of fallow with cinnamon creates a lutino look-a-like.
European breeders didn't realise this until few years ago.
But ... why not breed this combination? As professional breeders keep good records of pairings and mutations from offspring, it should not be a big problem?
I breed cinnamon yellowcheek fallow for three years now, magnificent birds - to my opinion - and with lots of yellow psittacine. I even breed this combination with opaline (pearl).

3...Avoid introducing pearl into the fallow mutation. Over the last 20 years several breeder of the rarer color mutations have learned that when pearl is bred into the fallow it can contribute to thin feathering behind the crest to huge bald spots.

I also have bred a few opaline bronze fallow. So far, I did not experience opaline to increase baldness or thin feathering behind the crest.
It is also useful mentioning that - as in the case of cinnamon - opaline combined with fallow creates a light coloured bird, characterized by its dark brown flight feather tips.


I also have some experiences to share, I think these are common knowledge in the USA as well? :

1. Fallow tends to increase yellow psittacine pigmentation (as well as cinnamon, to a lesser degree).
I mentioned the cinnamon yellowcheek fallow I breed, they tend to have a brighter yellow colour. Me and my colleages are still discussing if split fallow also has an effect, this does not always seem to be so.

2. There's great variation between fallow birds in colour intensity. Most of them are (very) light brown, others are darker almost looking like cinnamon.
(in pale fallow the variation is even greater)


To finish, some pictures:

Opaline cinnamon yellowcheek bronze fallow (adult female)


Opaline yellowcheek bronze fallow (young bird) of a friend of mine:

Breeder and photographer: Kurt Hermans

To the left: PALE fallow whiteface:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The fallows you posted look more like the cinnamon lutinos in the US. Their color is totally different than the fallows that originated in the US. Could this be a result of other mutations such and cinnamon and lutino in the background diluting the color?

The yellow content to the face is actually deeper colored with the female fallows than the males in the US.

Your pale fallow WF looks like a Recessive Silver WF. In the US the WF fallows are very dilute.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
mentioned the cinnamon yellowcheek fallow I breed, they tend to have a brighter yellow colour. Me and my colleages are still discussing if split fallow also has an effect, this does not always seem to be so.
-------------------------------------------------



OK...one thing I learned when breeding for splits to fallow is to try and select a normal (hold back young like the pix below) that has alot of yellow arounfd the edges of the face. If you pair pied with fallow for splits try to use the pieds with very deep colored yellow. This yellow is also useful for enhancing the color when YC is being bred for. And the deeper yellow on the normal mutation tends to also contribute to a more brillant and cleaner looking white on WF mutations.

Also...are the fallow hens a lighter color than the cocks in your country? I found that this slight difference has been consistant in the US and also in helping to determine (actually take a guess at) the sex when young. The other odd thing is that it is harder to get hens than cocks with the fallows. It seems like it is a 65% cockas to a 35% hens ratio. The same thing with some other mutations like Emerald/Olive.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
The fallows you posted look more like the cinnamon lutinos in the US. Their color is totally different than the fallows that originated in the US. Could this be a result of other mutations such and cinnamon and lutino in the background diluting the color? .
The pictures in my first post show combinations with bronze fallow and cinnamon and/or opaline, which creates these ligth coloured birds.
I did'nt post a picture of a normal "European" bronze fallow yet:




I believe this one looks about the same as USA bronze fallow birds?

Your pale fallow WF looks like a Recessive Silver WF. In the US the WF fallows are very dilute.
With pale fallow the body colour varies between dark brown (darker than cinnamon) to pale gray. The pale fallow above is thus a dark specimen.
Perhaps this is the same mutation as USA recessive silver? I'll have to check this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
OK...one thing I learned when breeding for splits to fallow is to try and select a normal (hold back young like the pix below) that has alot of yellow arounfd the edges of the face. If you pair pied with fallow for splits try to use the pieds with very deep colored yellow. This yellow is also useful for enhancing the color when YC is being bred for. And the deeper yellow on the normal mutation tends to also contribute to a more brillant and cleaner looking white on WF mutations.
Thanks for the tips!
On the other hand, enhanced yellow is not always wanted.
These birds often tend to have yellow in their "wing bars" (correct translation?) and for this they loose points on bird shows.

Also...are the fallow hens a lighter color than the cocks in your country? I found that this slight difference has been consistant in the US and also in helping to determine (actually take a guess at) the sex when young. The other odd thing is that it is harder to get hens than cocks with the fallows. It seems like it is a 65% cockas to a 35% hens ratio. The same thing with some other mutations like Emerald/Olive.
Indeed from my experience too it seems hens are slightly lighter, although the difference is not substantial.
Possible explanation is that hens have more psittacine in there body feathers, thus causing a dilution. Also wildtype (normal) hens usually are slightly lighter coloured compared to cocks.
I don't have experienced a deviation from the normal 50/50 cock/hen ratio. But I only breed small numbers of bronze fallow so I can't be sure about this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes the European Bronze fallow looks like out US fallows. In the US the lutino appearing fallows are very undesirable. When they do pop up the serious breeders have to work backwards for several generations to breed out the cinnamon and get the fallow coloration back.

These birds often tend to have yellow in their "wing bars" (correct translation?) and for this they loose points on bird shows.
-------------------------

I have seen the yellow wash to the wing bars in the nest as they were feathering, but I found that an addition of the water soluble nutrients to the food that the parents are feeding or to the handfeeding formula elimiates this yelow wash by the time they are weaned. Brewers Yeast is the best source of the water soluble nutrients.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top