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Discussion Starter #1
Rudi has now laid 10 eggs in the last month or so. Trying hormone control measures from the forum here but have not worked so far. Should I try removing the eggs from the cage? Should i take her to the vet? Behavior and overall health seem to be fine right now but I know its not good to keep laying the eggs. Should I wait longer?

Thanks in advance

:pied:
 

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I definitely wouldn't remove the eggs. She may decide to replace them. What all have you tried so far?

It's important to make sure she gets calcium. For the time being, at least, stay away from calcium absorbing foods like Spinach -- feed things like Kale instead. I would also scrape some cuttlebone onto her food. Tums will also work if you don't have one on hand, but they contain sugar, so unless under vet instruction I wouldn't use them regularly.

What's her diet, and what's her cage like? How often do you change it around, and have you tried adding new things?

I've been there, unfortunately -- I wish you the best of luck. You and Rudi have my support. A vet may be a good option (it certainly couldn't hurt), but it may not be necessary.
 

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We have been trying the "darkness" treatment most days. About ten to twelve hours. We have changed the cage around several times and have tried not to overfeed her. We even removed any objects that she liked to rub herself on. She will occasionally get some fresh veggies, mostly brocolli. We recently started giving her some stress food from the pet store.
She seems to settle down for a couple of days but then begins her "mating dance" again and rubbing herself on whatever she can find. Just concerned about her long term health.
We'll keep trying.....
Thanks for the response.
 

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Try upping it to 12-14 hours if you can. My bird does best on 13. It may take time.

If she does see a vet, injections and implants can be used to interrupt the hormones going on in the body. They may be able to find other things to help your girl, too. Food high and fat and protein may encourage breeding -- what pellets/seeds is she eating? Upping the amount of veggies she eats can help, too, if you can. My girl is picky but I've heard diet can help a ton. I'm not sure if this is an actual thing that helps, but I'm also doing trick-training with my girl in hopes that it distracts her from her desire to mate.

I have also heard of using an avian probiotic during stressful periods. It may help keep her immune system boosted.
 

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I would leave the eggs as they were. Don't take them out, don't move them. Leave them until your bird shows disinterest in them, That may be 2 weeks or more before she shows disinterest. If any are cracked, or broken replace them with fake eggs readily available on the internet. When you see that she's not sitting on them anymore, then you can take them out. But give her a few days to make sure she isn't sitting on them anymore. (like 4 or 5 days)
 

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Welllllll,,,,,,,, I've had a few females over 30+ years and we always took the egg away right away.

When we had only a single female that was generally good enough. She'd lay 3 or 4 eggs over a week and then stop.

When we had 2 females at the same time it seemed as though one laying would stimulate the other to lay but we still took the eggs away right away and limited their daylight and that usually did the trick.

It's a bit heartbreaking to limit the daylight (which includes putting them in darkness in the early evening, say around 7 or 8 o'clock, when you're home and want to enjoy their company as even artificial light in the evening is enough to keep them awake and active. It's especially difficult to do the "darkness thing" if you're at work all day.

I agree though, 10-12 isn't enough. Winter around here (the non-procreating season) is only daylight for 10 hours. That's 14 hours of darkness. Try that. And you need to do it every day until she stops.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Try upping it to 12-14 hours if you can. My bird does best on 13. It may take time.

If she does see a vet, injections and implants can be used to interrupt the hormones going on in the body. They may be able to find other things to help your girl, too. Food high and fat and protein may encourage breeding -- what pellets/seeds is she eating? Upping the amount of veggies she eats can help, too, if you can. My girl is picky but I've heard diet can help a ton. I'm not sure if this is an actual thing that helps, but I'm also doing trick-training with my girl in hopes that it distracts her from her desire to mate.

I have also heard of using an avian probiotic during stressful periods. It may help keep her immune system boosted.
Her everyday food is Vitakraft Complete Nutrition. It is supplemented with some broccoli and now Kale as suggested
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would leave the eggs as they were. Don't take them out, don't move them. Leave them until your bird shows disinterest in them, That may be 2 weeks or more before she shows disinterest. If any are cracked, or broken replace them with fake eggs readily available on the internet. When you see that she's not sitting on them anymore, then you can take them out. But give her a few days to make sure she isn't sitting on them anymore. (like 4 or 5 days)
What Im concerned about however is that the egg laying started in the beginning of December at least and now she layed another egg today for a total of 11 so far. She has never sat on them or really showed any interest in them from what Ive seen.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Welllllll,,,,,,,, I've had a few females over 30+ years and we always took the egg away right away.

When we had only a single female that was generally good enough. She'd lay 3 or 4 eggs over a week and then stop.

When we had 2 females at the same time it seemed as though one laying would stimulate the other to lay but we still took the eggs away right away and limited their daylight and that usually did the trick.

It's a bit heartbreaking to limit the daylight (which includes putting them in darkness in the early evening, say around 7 or 8 o'clock, when you're home and want to enjoy their company as even artificial light in the evening is enough to keep them awake and active. It's especially difficult to do the "darkness thing" if you're at work all day.

I agree though, 10-12 isn't enough. Winter around here (the non-procreating season) is only daylight for 10 hours. That's 14 hours of darkness. Try that. And you need to do it every day until she stops.
She's up to 11 eggs as of today. Im thinking about taking them out now. I feel like i have nothing to lose since leaving them has had no effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
She's up to 11 eggs as of today. Im thinking about taking them out now. I feel like i have nothing to lose since leaving them has had no effect.
P.S. We initially took the eggs out in the beginning until she laid four or five and then we started leaving them.
 

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She's up to 11 eggs as of today. Im thinking about taking them out now. I feel like i have nothing to lose since leaving them has had no effect.
You need to get drastic with limiting her light.

Make sure she's in the dark for 14 hours per day. She'll stop.

If she doesn't stop after a week or 10 days you will need to take her to an avian vet.
 
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