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Ok, I'm not sure if this is the right place for this but here I go. I know that "smelly things" aren't awesome for birds in general, but I need to know if I can still burn them. Are there ways around this? Can I simply turn on a fan and open a window? I live in an apartment with roomies. I don't have anywhere, other than my room, that I can burn my incense. I'm a very spiritual person and incense are a key factor in my daily spiritual walks. Espcially when dealing with an entity/spirit/ghost that has decided to intrude on my territory. I know there are rules for everything but there are, also, usually ways around them. Little cheats and such. Please help. I need feed back.
 

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If you can smell it , it will probably harm him. :(

Any way you can move his cage somewhere else while you burn it, then allow the room to completely air out before moving him back in? That's the only way I can think of. I burn soy wax all-natural candles with the window open but not in the same room as the birds.
 

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That's where the whole "I live with roomies" thing comes in. I can't put her anywhere else. :/ They have a 3 year old and a 2 month old. Milo leaving the room with out MY direct/immediate/constant supervision is out of the question. Unless I put her in the closet, but I don't think she'd be very happy about that. Lol.
 

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Ah, I see. Here is an explanation of how birds breathe: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=15+1829&aid=2721

And, here is a bit on Wikipedia about the toxins in incense: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incense#Health

"Incense smoke contains various contaminants including gaseous pollutants, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and absorbed toxic pollutants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and toxic metals). The solid particles range between ~10 and 500 nm. The emission rate decreases in the row Indian sandalwood > Japanese aloeswood > Taiwanese aloeswood > smokeless sandalwood.

Research carried out in Taiwan in 2001 linked the burning of incense sticks to the slow accumulation of potential carcinogens in a poorly ventilated environment by measuring the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (including benzopyrene) within Buddhist temples. The study found gaseous aliphatic aldehydes, which are carcinogenic and mutagenic, in incense smoke.

A survey of risk factors for lung cancer, also conducted in Taiwan, noted an inverse association between incense burning and adenocarcinoma of the lung, though the finding was not deemed significant....

Although several studies have not shown a link between incense and cancer of the lung, many other types of cancer have been directly linked to burning incense. A study published in 2008 in the medical journal Cancer found that incense use is associated with a statistically significant higher risk of cancers of the upper respiratory tract, with the exception of nasopharyngeal cancer. Those who used incense heavily also had higher rates of a type of cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, which refers to tumors that arise in the cells lining the internal and external surfaces of the body. The link between incense use and increased cancer risk held when the researchers weighed other factors, including cigarette smoking, diet and drinking habits. The research team noted that "This association is consistent with a large number of studies identifying carcinogens in incense smoke, and given the widespread and sometimes involuntary exposure to smoke from burning incense, these findings carry significant public health implications."


I wouldn't want that anywhere near my birds personally!
 

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Sorry, don't really know what to tell you <_< except good luck I guess. Ya, I agree. I'm very defensive about my birds, I will not take ANYTHING from anybody ;)
 

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Not safe at all to have around them :( I would ask your roomies to not use them if they wont maybe it is time to think about your own place if you can afford it or finding new roomies ?
 

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How long does your incense routine take?
I have a little pet carrier I use for Sid, and I can put him in it to move him from room to room (we have cats and dogs so not safe to let him out un-restrained.) If it's not too long you could put him in a pet carrier like that and pop him somewhere out of harms' way (on top of a cupboard in the bathroom? In a roomie's room but somewhere the toddler can't reach?)
This is the sort of thing I have. I put Sid in it to take him on car rides also (and let him out in the car while I'm parked.) He didn't like it at first but now he's used to it and just hops right in: http://www.gjwtitmuss.co.uk/small-animal-carriers/pid23843/cid379/ferplast-aladino-small-animal-carrier-large-assorted-colours.asp?utm_source=googlebase&utm_medium=pricecomp&utm_campaign=GoogleShopping&gclid=CKG0tKenzboCFRMftAodygsAaQ
 

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I use incense and haven't had any negative reactions from my Sammy. I don't burn it in the same room I burn it in one room and let the aroma spread through the house. Using a travel cage to relocate your tiel while you use the incense sounds like a great idea and solution. You could even move your tiel out of doors for some fresh air and sunshine.
 
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