Talk Cockatiels Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,093 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Due to a recent thread, I'm having to put out a warning to everyone on this forum, including new people, new owners, even if you've owned a Cockatiel/Cockatiels for a long time.

Please DO NOT take your Cockatiel(s) outside unless they're in a secured cage or in a harness.

Even if your Cockatiel(s) wings are clipped, there is STILL a risk of a gust of wind coming and your Cockatiel(s) can get flight from that and you will end up with your beloved Cockatiel(s) being lost.

Secured Cage - by putting your Cockatiel(s) outside in a secure cage, you will know they're not only safe, but cannot fly away. If you decide to put your Cockatiel(s) outside, please make sure they're under close supervision; if you have cats roaming around or even dogs, your Cockatiel(s) can be seriously hurt, even killed if either one of these 4 legged animals get to them. Also bigger birds out in the wild such as Hawks can easily come down and attack your Cockatiel(s) even through cage bars, it's not difficult, any sort of bird like this will result in your Cockatiel(s) being injured badly or killed.

You can take them out in their normal cage they are kept in, or you can buy a little cage just for while they're outside and transfer them back into their normal cage once back inside.

**Please make sure the bottom of the cage is secure before you take it outside! Cage bottoms can come loose and your bird(s) will fly away if this happens.**

Here's a few nice little cages that would be perfect to go outside in:











SIDE NOTE: Please make sure any cages you use to take your Cockatiel(s) outside in, have the right bar spacing, I would go no bigger than 1/2".

Harness - there's a lot of Harnesses used these days, a very popular harness is the Aviator Harness - this is one of the safest Harnesses out there and is easy to use as well as easy to put on your Cockatiel(s)! Using one of these will guarantee your birds safety as well as being able to hang out with you outside or in your backyard/frontyard, again please be careful and preferebly have your Cockatiel(s) away from any dogs/cats.

The Aviator Harness:






**Please make sure your bird's harness is fitting snugly and secure before taking them outside!**

This is not to pick on people, or tell you what you should and shouldn't do, but your Cockatiel(s) safety relys on you, and we're all just looking out for your Cockatiel(s), we hate to see people lose any bird that means a lot to them, therefore, caging or harnessing your bird while outside means no worries and you don't have to worry about your bird flying off and having a owner heartbroken.

If you have any questions, or have something to add to this thread, you can PM me or reply to this thread. Thanks. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
The clipped bird + gust of wind is no small risk. I know a woman locally that took her freshly clipped cockatoo into the back yard, and whilst chatting with the neighbour across the fence, a gust came up and the cockatoo managed to get enough air to glide two yards over where he was promptly eaten by a dog.

As far as the raptor (hawk/falcon/etc) risk goes...never underestimate how lighting fast and completely silent a raptor can strike...you will likely never know they are there until it is far too late. Remember too...a harness will keep your bird from flying off, but not protect against a raptor, and even if your bird is sitting quietly, a raptor can spot it easily from 500 meters away.

And for those of you where they are about, beware of weasels and snakes...both of which love birds and can get through some pretty narrow cage bars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
627 Posts
Raptors don't make any sound when they fly. That's how they can dive-bomb other birds or prey and the prey doesn't know they're coming until it's too late. The design of their wings is such that air goes through them silently. So you won't hear them coming, either. We take our Quakers outdoors, IN their cages, and only when we are sitting right there with them, and we keep them with us on the deck. It's unlikely, but not impossible, that a raptor or a cat would try to get to them with us there, but if we're sitting a few inches away we can intervene and defend them. We'll probably take Freddie outdoors in his cage, too, this summer, under the same conditions. Even with a harness, I'd be uneasy about taking a bird outdoors without a cage, for the bird's safety. I've watched my dogs slip out of their collars and one dog I had could slip out of a harness like Houdini, so I wouldn't trust a bird harness very far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,093 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Even with a harness, I'd be uneasy about taking a bird outdoors without a cage, for the bird's safety. I've watched my dogs slip out of their collars and one dog I had could slip out of a harness like Houdini, so I wouldn't trust a bird harness very far.
You're comparing a DOG COLLAR to a BIRD HARNESS, sorry but they're two completely different things. A dog can slip out of a collar easily, they have more strength than a Cockatiel.. I have the Aviator Harness and I take my Green Cheek Conure everywhere with me and she's never slipped out once. I also know people on another forum (around over 40 people) who also use the Aviator Harness on their Lovebirds, Amazons, Cockatoos, Sun Conures, African Greys and they're a lot stronger then Cockatiels but have never escaped either. Before you start judging Harnesses why not do research on them before hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
... in my area we have problems with raccoons and bear tearing open cages to get to animals inside.
Good point...raccoons especially can be terrible...and terribly sneaky/quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,610 Posts
yes its happened! a hawk even as small as a sharp shinned hawk (hardly bigger than a pigeon) can take down a bird its own size, it even preys specifically on BIRDS! in europe, asia its closest thing to compare it to would be a sparrowhawk as they are all accipiter hawks, meaning true hawks that hunt other birds. do not be fooled they dont live around you. they live in suburban parks, backyards, even city streets with trees.

Heres some pictures ive taken of these particular hawks being banded at a local conservation area! do NOT underestimate that size, they will kill a tiel in a matter of seconds.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
On that note, it is also dangerous to have your tiels out while cooking! There is a member on here whose tiel flew into hot grease and had some pretty severe burns. It made it okay but i'm sure it was super painful and it had to be traumatic. I wouldn't even want to imagine what would happen with fire from a grill and a tiel... =/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
I am bumping this thread because it needs to be seen! There, quite recently, have been 2 posts about member's cockatiels flying away. And that is 2 too many in my opinion. It shouldn't be happening! These 2 threads made me write this post:

http://talkcockatiels.com/showthread.php?t=32730

http://talkcockatiels.com/showthread.php?t=32813

Thankfully, both members got their birds back..one the next morning, and one immediately after. But you should NEVER take your bird(s) outside without a harness or cage. It is not being a responsible bird owner, and you are risking their lives everytime you do it.

Please everyone read through this thread..there is a really well written topic at the beginning and personal experiences following.

Here is my experience:

My rescue bird, who has broken wings, escaped out a door earlier this month. I was misting her (and she hates her baths) so as soon as someone opened the door she took off. This is a bird who never flies more than 2 feet off the ground and never goes more than 5 feet away. Allie flew out my door, hung a sharp left, and flew 50 yards into my next door neighbor's yard. Thankfully, his cat was not around and she landed in a small bush. So, while my story isn't related to irresponsibly taking my bird outside without a cage or harness, it proves that even when you think your bird can't fly (broken wings/clipped wings), I assure you it can.

Don't risk your bird's life. If you want to take it outside then go spend $25 and buy it a harness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
I think it is somewhat funny you guys are scared of hawks and falcons... has anyone ever really lost an animal to these birds??! I personally have a chihuahua and pinscher and they spend 8hrs in the backyard everyday, I have 25km of forest in there (lotso birds and stuffs.. racoons, black bear, etc) and I never really even bothered thinking they could atk my dogs... they're not bigger than a rabbit (4 and 5 pounds)
Now I am not saying letting the bird outside is a good idea, far from there.. the racoons are indeed a treat to them but I think we must not go parano tho!
I would like to try that bird harness too!! I used to care for a military ara and I used to run around the place, holding his claws just so he thinks he s flying;P he would do just like flying with his wings, and scream like ****! I think he really enjoyed it :p good exercise
This is very naive thinking on your part, not to mention completely unsafe. Small dogs should NEVER be alone outside unattended, especially not for 8 hours. Hawks can and HAVE attacked and killed small dogs. Especially being in a rural area, there are so many things that could kill your dogs. Raccoons and other animals can be vicious and have rabies, and if your dog isn't killed he could get rabies (vaccine is not 100% safe). You NEED to start keeping your dogs inside, they could get seriously hurt. Leaving them out there is like playing with fire.

These people are not paranoid. It is not paranoia when trying to prevent escape, injury, or worse, death. Definitely not funny that we are worried about it, as it is a serious issue with small animal owners. Birds, cats, dogs, small mammals, etc, are ALL in danger of wildlife, it is our duty to protect them as their owners. Even if your pets are too heavy to be actually picked up, the damage from a hawk's claws or a raccoon's bite can still be very bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
Thank you for your post, lilasmom. It is good to know that people are reading this sticky. It was made back in 2010 and hasn't been active for some time now so I brought it back up in the list by posting in it.

The user FwoGiZ has not been active since February of 2011, but your statement can go towards anyone else who feels the same as he did about wildlife predators. Notice the video that follows..a hawk swooped down and tried to kill a cockatoo during a zoo's presentation. Yes, the hawk was a part of the zoo, BUT it proves how keen their eyesight is and that they will prey on birds (and won't let go of people, apparently). And for people who think wildlife is not present in their area..wildlife stays hidden so you likely don't see any of the predators lurking in your area, but that is why they are called "wild."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,610 Posts
I am an avid bird watcher, especially for birds of prey. i live in a large city, for my area. I see evidence of birds that most people miss. i know what to look for. MANY people do not realize that hawks lurk right outside their doors, preying upon the little sparrows and robins in their front yards!

For those living in north america, i can briefly give a good list of every urban and suburban bird of prey or birds of interest that would no doubt attack a cockatiel. I will provide any pictures I have on hand, provide links to others, and provide links proving that they are indeed in cities!


Sharp Shinned Hawk
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/sharp-shinned_hawk/id



Found in cities and towns very frequently, i live in a city and the photo above was taken in the heart of my city. These birds are experts at catching birds, even in flight. They are capable of taking down birds as big as they are, which includes cockatiels, who are only slightly smaller than the females, and just as large as the males! They are also fairly bold and will often purposely chase small birds into windows for easy prey. They stalk bird feeders frequently as well. They are ambush predators and will not be seen often until too late.
This photo shows how small male sharpies are. This is a photo of one i had adopted as part of a conservation program, this guy was released into the wild after being caught and banded. He had made a kill prior to being caught! he is capable of taking a tiel!


This is my husband with his adopted female, notice much larger size, they would easily not think twice about grabbing a tiel!


Cooper's Hawk
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Coopers_Hawk/id



Larger relative of the sharp shinned hawk. Males of this species are about the same size as the female sharpies. Females of this species are large. They are fully capable of taking cockatiels and birds up to the size of sun conures. They lurk often in city parks and backyards. They are known to drown their prey and even chase it on foot! they are adaptive and like the sharpie, they are ambush predators. They are an accipiter hawk, meaning true hawk, and like true hawks they hunt specifically birds.


Merlin
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/merlin/id





A small falcon, about the size of a smaller male sharpie. This bird is one that feeds almost exclusively on birds. It has become a regular city bird and is notorious among hawk watchers for disappearing nearly as soon as it is sighted as it is fast and direct. Females (the one in the above photo that i was holding many years ago, my first adopted raptor) are much larger than males and are capable of taking down a tiel. Notice in the link, one of the photos of the bird is a female merlin with a pigeon, which is the same size as the falcon. you can see how easy it would be for a tiel to fall victim.



American Kestrel
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Kestrel/id





Not as likely to attack or hunt large birds, mostly song birds, it's still a city falcon and one to be cautious about. Females are more of a danger.



Peregrine Falcon
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Peregrine_Falcon/id

sorry no personal photos of mine

This is a famous one for living in cities with skyscrapers. It nests in cities and takes birds as large as ducks. This bird can very well attack a cockatiel, no doubt, but you are more likely to see a cooper's or sharpie or merlin than a peregrine.



Red Tailed Hawk

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-tailed_Hawk/id



This is a large hawk, part of the buteo family of hawks. These hawks tend to soar in circles high in the sky and are defined by long broad wings, unlike the accipiters who have short broad wings for flying between trees and hedges. Red tails are adaptive hunters who can hover, kite (fly stationary into the wind), perch hunt, and chase down their prey and even stoop on their prey like peregrines. They are often found in cities and have been known to hunt birds.


Red Shouldered Hawk
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-shouldered_Hawk/id

(no photo sorry)

This is another buteo, and it's more common in suburbs down near Florida and the south-eastern states. It is found elsewhere in North America, but is more of a forest bird. This bird has been known to be an adaptive and skilled hunter and it should be given caution.



American Crow

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Crow/id

Sorry no personal photo

This bird isnt a bird of prey, but it is very famous for its intelligence and boldness. It has been very well known to attack birds and has been known to attack cockatiels and caged birds.



Be warned, if it isnt escape you want to worry about, its predators... Don't be fooled into thinking you are safe for living in a city!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,610 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,610 Posts
WARNING: this video might be scary for some viewers and i do not recommend anyone trying this! the purpose of this video is to show that hawks mean business and are not afraid to tackle birds that are bigger than them!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikDpYwDKQ_A

a show bird, but look at the size difference between the too and the hawk... they dont mess around! this is a well fed hawk, so think what a hungry predator could do. they are bold.


ive personally been dive bombed by a sharp shinned hawk. it came close enough to touch the top of my head. i didnt have my birds with me, but they are BOLD birds. and a sharpie is a small accipiter hawk in north america, measuring only 12" long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,164 Posts
To all forum members: don't allow any one else's examples allow you to develop the confidence needed to fuel rash decisions about taking your birds out unharnessed or uncaged.

:)
 
  • Like
Reactions: ollieandme

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
I am going to add that no matter how bonded you think your bird is to you if something were to happen they may not be able to get back to you. Or birds can get ahold of them. In the grand scheme of things it really is not worth it to take tgat risk.

Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,909 Posts
So the mods and I decided to close and clean up this sticky. While there were a lot of good stories in here it was getting a little out of hand. If you guys still want to share stories like this we can open a separate thread for you to do so. Happy posting!! :D
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top