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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My cockatiel, Totoro, has been with me for the last two and a half years. I got her when she was very young. As advised by the breeder, I held her several times a day to my chest until she was calm and then put her back in her cage. I was pretty young at the time and rather inconsistent, so it took quite a few weeks, but she ended up loving "cuddle time" and sitting on my head. She now calls to me, will step up willingly, loves shoulder and head time, and eats from my hand. But she will hiss at me quite a bit when I go get her from my indoor aviary, where she currently is alone. She will threaten to bite especially if someone else tries to get her out, but also with me sometimes. I completely ignore any bad behavior. She NEVER bites. I would like to guide her to be more friendly towards strangers and family, so that my son will not be frightened of her and they can develop a friendship when he is old enough. I was eight when I made friends with a bird and it teaches children so much about empathy and compassion to care for such a delicate creature.
My new bird, Calcifer, is very wild. He is at least a year old and has spent his entire life in a filthy garage with way too many birds. Very bad conditions with no contact to humans. I have clipped his wings and I am getting him used to me being around his cage and changing the water and such. I also put my hand inside the cage with birdseed to show him that "I am food". I roll his food between my hands let it smell slightly like me. He is very frightful. Can anyone assure me that he is possible to tame? I will not let him in the avairy until he is tame.
I am on maternity leave ontil august when I will be going back to school. I wish he can sit on my shoulder by then.
Sorry if my english is not so good. :)
 

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Hello. This should solve your problem....
With nervous birds, cover half the cage to make them feel safe
& secure but take care not to stand over them like a predator.
I always use a small piece their favourite food as treats during
the taming sessions.

I normally tame eight birds in a cage at the same time so the
slowest bird learns from their more forward cage mates.
One, two or eight birds, the training method is the same.
I don't let them out of cage, till all are happy to perch on my
hand to eat, as any chasing & catching can ruin any bond
already built-up between you & your birds.
Neither are you teaching the remaining birds anything.
While your playing with one out of the cage.

First I offer the birds a few pecks of a treat food, through the bars.
If they show any fear or attempt to bite me , I remove my hand
& the treat for a count of 10. I re-offer the treat & do this as
often as it takes.

I give them treats little & often, so my visits mean nice things to
eat. After a day or so of successful feeding, the birds will be ready
for hand feeding inside the cage.

I hold the treat food on my fingers, palm up close to the perch so
they can all eat. During the next few days I move the treat onto
my palm, so they have to step-up on to my hand to reach to eat.

After a further day or two, I can take the birds from the cage for
a fly round, knowing I can return them with a treat in the cage &
a small treat in hand as a step-up reward..

Professional trainers & performers always give a treat to ensure
a friendly, happy compliance & as a distraction...
Even if it's only one peck at a millet spray.....B.J.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you! That was a very nice response. :) I will try to do that.
 

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http://talkcockatiels.com/showthread.php?t=33824 Try this taming method for the new boy. It will help with his wildness.

For your girl, the only way for her to get used to other people is for her to be around them. Even if its just them offering her millet. She's only known you to be nice so she may not know that other people can be as well.
 
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