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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First concern to make this thread is that I've noticed that my cockatiel sometimes has this occasional black looking droppings. She has a few of these in a row and then the droppings return back to normal. Is this something to worry about?

I have also started feeding her these pellets as of late http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3627717&lmdn=Product+Type and they seem to tint her droppings a little bit red-oringish. She's never had that color prior to the pellets.

Like some of you might know, my bird had a really stressful time about one year ago and I think it was a stress seizure. You can read more here: http://talkcockatiels.com/showthread.php?t=16976
I visited a vet a few weeks ago and explained her this situation. I also sent in a droppings sample as per vet request. When I told her about my concerns on the phone, (I was worried about the color of the droppings (not the black ones) as well as this: http://talkcockatiels.com/showthread.php?t=26580) she told me she'd do the droppings examination and tell me what else she would recommend after. HOWEVER, when I talked to her in person, and showed her several videos of my tiel she didn't seem concerned at all and said that the droppings examination would be unnecessary as they seemed really normal to her.

Of course no other vet around would even accept the offer of me bringing in the sample without having a physical exam first. I literally called all the vet's in my city and some were kind enough to say that they didn't treat birds instead of taking the responsibility anyways. But this all makes me wonder though, maybe the reason why she didn't do the exam was because we didn't have a physical exam first?

I talked to her about the seizure situation too and she said that if I brought her in, that could be a problem. She even went as far as telling me that before she handles a bird (mine isn't very tame) she always warns the owner of a possible cardiac arrest. However, if I noticed a bigger change, the risk should be taken.

I'm just really puzzled on what to do. Any advice???
 

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She even went as far as telling me that before she handles a bird (mine isn't very tame) she always warns the owner of a possible cardiac arrest.
I find this very unusual. Yes, it's a possibility. But birds go to the vet all the time, get handled, have stressful procedures...and don't go into cardiac arrest. I understand that it's more of a risk because of your bird's history, but there has to be a way to get her healthcare. Where are you located? Some states have mobile vets that will see birds at your house. If you tell us your general location, we might be able to help you locate something like this.
 

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The vet can draw some blood for bloodwork to see the calcium levels in her body. Sometimes hyocalcemia (low calcium levels) can cause seizures.

The next time she has the dar/black droppings smear them on a white piece of paper, and hold up to a strong light. If it is food related it will be a dark green color....if it is blood in the upper GI tract it will be a rust color.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I find this very unusual. Yes, it's a possibility. But birds go to the vet all the time, get handled, have stressful procedures...and don't go into cardiac arrest. I understand that it's more of a risk because of your bird's history, but there has to be a way to get her healthcare. Where are you located? Some states have mobile vets that will see birds at your house. If you tell us your general location, we might be able to help you locate something like this.
Las Vegas, Nevada
(goes to edit profile)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
enigma731, I've already called all those.
The ones on the mobile vets site were those that didn't treat birds any more except the Gentle Doctor one is the one that I went too. She said she didn't do house calls anymore though.
 

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If he seizures are calcium related you might try shaving some cuttlebone into powder and sprinkling it on her foods. Also with the dark droppings he intestinal flora might be out of whack, s probiotics might be beneficial.

If the vet you had seen no longer does house calls would she consider a video conference to do an examine and have you come in with samples of fresh droppings for grams stains?
 

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Well, your other option might be to start acclimating your bird slowly to change like riding in the car. This is probably a good idea anyway, in case you ever needed to leave with her in an emergency.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The vet can draw some blood for bloodwork to see the calcium levels in her body. Sometimes hyocalcemia (low calcium levels) can cause seizures.

The next time she has the dar/black droppings smear them on a white piece of paper, and hold up to a strong light. If it is food related it will be a dark green color....if it is blood in the upper GI tract it will be a rust color.
Sorry foe the late ryple. I loost accessto my computer and just got on my phone!

So, should there really be nothing to worry about the black droppings if the shade is green then?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If he seizures are calcium related you might try shaving some cuttlebone into powder and sprinkling it on her foods. Also with the dark droppings he intestinal flora might be out of whack, s probiotics might be beneficial.

If the vet you had seen no longer does house calls would she consider a video conference to do an examine and have you come in with samples of fresh droppings for grams stains?
What ddo you mean by "dark droppings he intestinal flora might be out of whack"?

And I'm unsure about the second part too! I did show her videos and the droppings I sent in were as fresh as could be for a 40 minute ride!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, your other option might be to start acclimating your bird slowly to change like riding in the car. This is probably a good idea anyway, in case you ever needed to leave with her in an emergency.
This is definitely a good idea. I'm also working on taming her, but her attitude towards us has changed so much since her buddy left us! :(
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Also the red-oringy tinted droppings are most definitely from those pellets right? Should I stop giving her those for a while to be sure?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yes...it sounds like the color from the Zupreem pellets.
And if the urates and urine are a bit tinted too with this color? The urates is always white without the pellets but the urine morphs to a green tint as it dries. This wwas the main reason I contacted the vet, because of the tint after it dries.
 

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And if the urates and urine are a bit tinted too with this color? The urates is always white without the pellets but the urine morphs to a green tint as it dries. This wwas the main reason I contacted the vet, because of the tint after it dries.
They always dry slightly tinted. :) This used to freak me out too, but as long as the fresh ones are white, it should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Also, about the dark ones... If they are tinted green and not rusty after I smear them, should it be fine? I heard that sometimes these have to do with the bird not eating enough?

She tends to not eat if me or my siblings aren't home, so maybe this could have been it too. Today, when I came from school, she ran immediately to her food dish and has been eating her broccoli non-stop. Do you guys' tiels not eat when you are away as well? I have a feeling all mine does is sleep and preen when I'm not home...
 

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Also, about the dark ones... If they are tinted green and not rusty after I smear them, should it be fine? I heard that sometimes these have to do with the bird not eating enough?

She tends to not eat if me or my siblings aren't home, so maybe this could have been it too. Today, when I came from school, she ran immediately to her food dish and has been eating her broccoli non-stop. Do you guys' tiels not eat when you are away as well? I have a feeling all mine does is sleep and preen when I'm not home...
Some tiels do what is called social eating - they don't eat if they're alone. My bird Roo is like this, and she had all kinds of problems maintaining weight last semester. Since I've brought my parents' other tiel to live with me, the issue has gone away because she no longer depends on me to eat. So yes, the darker droppings could have to do with her not eating for long stretches while you're out. Pictures of them would help us determine that.
 

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If your bird isn't eating while you're gone, put something in the cage that's so tempting and delicious that it'll be hard to resist. I'm thinking millet spray.

Millet spray makes a big mess, so if you put fresh paper in the cage bottom just before you leave and check it right after you come back, you'll have a good idea of whether she ate anything while you were gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Some tiels do what is called social eating - they don't eat if they're alone. My bird Roo is like this, and she had all kinds of problems maintaining weight last semester. Since I've brought my parents' other tiel to live with me, the issue has gone away because she no longer depends on me to eat. So yes, the darker droppings could have to do with her not eating for long stretches while you're out. Pictures of them would help us determine that.
Ok, I'll definitely take a picture next time she has one of those and post it in this thread! :)
 
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