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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, they also refer to sex linked and non sex linked but I have no information about my birds background. Do you know how I would enter the potential parent birds in this case?
 

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Yes, sex linked lutino will apply to your bird, most likely. It is the common one and I'm not even sure there are any non sex linked lutinos in Australia. I think it's just in Europe, and only in small numbers.

The abbreviation for sexlinked lutino is Zino.
Because it's sexlinked you ad the sex chromosome, Z. I know people talk about thier chomosomes as X and Y like ours but really they have Z and W. Male has two Z and female one Z and one W.

Hopefully that helps, I haven't used those calculators before.
 

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Never heard of a lutino that wasn't sexlinked. What mutation is your bird? The best way to figure out what his parents are is to know what he is. Has he had any babies? What his babies are will also help you figure out what his genetics are. I've used this calculator many times, it's pretty simple once you figure it out.

NSino-this is considered fallow in the states, it's not lutino. It looks similar to lutino, but is not the same.
Opaline is another name for the pearl mutation. We call it pearl in the states.
Recessive silver is extremely rare and even rarer to accurately define. The best I know is that recessive silver birds have red eyes (but aren't necessarily lutino).
Dominant silver is also very rare and there are two types, single factor and double factor. The difference is whether the bird got the gene from one of both parents. I don't know anything about the other silver listed here.
ADM. pied is the pied mutation
I don't know what faded is, never seen one of those.
whiteface birds are referred to as blue because blue coloring in tiels shows up as the whiteface gene. On that same note, pastelface is a similar gene, it's part of the whiteface gene. If you a breed a whiteface to a pastelface you can get pastelface babies, but they are technically consdered whiteface because whiteface is the dominant gene, they just appear pastelface. SUPER CONFUSING.

The one mutation missing is emerald. I forget what it's called overseas, but it is another rarely seen mutation.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I Have a lutino hen whose offspring were normal grey split pied when she had a clutch to a male who appeared normal grey. I am just wondering what would be a good pairing for her to produce some nice coloured chicks.
 

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Well it depends what you're looking for. You could get lutino babies if you got a male split to lutino. I wouldn't recommend putting a visual lutino male with a lutino female though.
You could get a cinnamon male, and (if I'm wrong, correct me because this part confuses me sometimes) you could get cinnamon and cinnamon-ino babies.
"The cinnamon gene has a close relationship with the sex linked lutino gene. Firstly, the two loci sit close together [on the Z chromosome], resulting in a small recombinant frequency of 3%. Secondly, the two genes interact to produce an unexpected phenotype in the cinnamon-ino bird."
 

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Very helpful, I've learned a lot. I'd definitely reccomend buying it. It's called 'a guide to cockatiels and their mutations as pet and aviary birds' by dr terry Martin and Diana Andersen.
 

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Also check out Susanne's book on cockatiel genetics, she's a member here and published last year.

A cinnamon male will give you cinnamon female chicks and male chicks that are split to cinnamon (on one allele) and split to lutino (from mom, on the other allele). There can be some crossover if you use these babies for breeding. Since you got all normal grey chicks from that pairing, it appears that the male is not split to lutino and at this point it seems he's not split to any other sexlinked mutation either. But one pairing isn't a very big sampling size. The female lutino passes that gene on to all her sons but not to her daughters.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You saying about Susanne's book reminded me that I had bought the ebook some time back so I am now reading that very slowly so that hopefully some of it sinks in lol. The hen in question is now living at a friend's house and we are looking at what would be a good mate for her, hopefully from what we have.
 

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Anyone who's read Terry Martin's books will notice that he complains a lot about nonstandardized terminology - the same mutation being called by different names in different species. There's a move afoot to use standardized terminology so the same mutation will be called by the same name in all species, and GenCalc uses this standard terminology. The problem is that very few people actually know the standardized terminology, so it's confusing when they try to use this calculator. It's challenging in other ways too, for example using 1.0 to mean male and 0.1 to mean female, instead of just saying male and female. This calculator is essential if you need to deal with crossovers or with certain rare mutations, but most people will find it easier to use the simpler calculator at http://www.kirstenmunson.com/cockatiels/blue.html

Here's how to decode the GenCalc terminology:

Cinnamon - self-explanatory

Yellow cheek - this is sex-linked yellow cheek only. I don't see dominant yellow cheek on this calculator, but the other calculator has it.

Ino - sex-linked lutino, the common one in cockatiels.
Pallid/platinum - an allele (different variation) of the lutino gene that has a less drastic effect on melanin coloring. Found only in Australia.

Opaline/pearl - self explanatory

Dilute/pastel silver - a rare mutation found only in Australia

NSL ino - this mutation is almost nonexistent in cockatiels, and possibly completely nonexistent at this point in time. Last I heard, there was one European breeder who had these birds and his whereabouts were currently unknown. But in some species it's a major mutation. In princess parrots it's the ONLY lutino mutation, they haven't developed a sex-linked lutino yet.

Bronze fallow - there are several fallow mutations, but this is the only one that's called fallow in the US, and we usually don't bother mentioning the word bronze. It's an allele (different variation) of the NSL ino gene that has a less drastic effect on melanin coloring.

Ashen dilute - the standard terminology for dominant silver has been dominant edged for quite a while so I don't know where they came up with "ashen dilute". Here's the official standardized terminology, and there's no ashen anything on it. http://www.ornitho-genetics.info/downloads/ia-uk.pdf

Edged dilute/silver spangle - another rare mutation found only in Australia

ADM pied - the type of pied that's found in cockatiels. There are several other pied mutations that occur in other species, so the word "pied" all by itself just doesn't cut it.

Faded - better known as West Coast Silver. Another rare Australia-only mutation.

Blue/whiteface - self explanatory.
Pastelface - ooh they slipped up on this one too! They should have called it aqua to be consistent with the international standards. Creamface isn't on the calculator but it corresponds to the turquoise mutation in other species.

I haven't tried out the other allelic mutations on GenCalc, but I know that the way you enter the input for the whiteface/pastelface conundrum is not in sync with the genetic reality. If anybody wants to play with calculations for these mutations, this article tells you how to do it: http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-allelic.html

Ashen fallow: there's been some confusion over whether this mutation should be called ashen fallow or pale fallow. Ashen fallow was originally considered the correct name, but pale fallow seems to have won in the end since that's the name in the current international standards. In any case they've been calling it pale fallow in Europe for years. In the US it's called recessive silver.

There are obviously some mutations missing from this calculator. Anybody who wants to run calculations for creamface should use the input for pastelface and change the name in your head. For emerald, pick any mutation in the calculator that says the inheritance mode is "re" (autosomal recessive) and change the name in your head. Or go to the simpler calculator and use the input for olive. It's not entirely clear whether emerald and olive are the same mutation or not, but the names are used sort of interchangeably.

There are some other missing rarities but I won't go into that except for this one which is kind of mind-boggling. It was originally thought that gold cheek was yet another variation of the whiteface gene, but the latest test breeding results indicate that it's actually sex-linked dominant. The mutation is so rare that it's a moot point for most of us, but I don't know of any other mutation in any parrot species that is sex-linked dominant. So the calculators can't help you on this one lol.
 

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Since there was some talk of crossovers in this thread, here's an article explaining how crossovers work: http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-crossovers.html Minor technical correction - crossovers occur between chromosomes, not between alleles. With crossovers you have completely different genes changing position relative to each other. Alleles are different variations of the same gene, which is a whole different can of worms. http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-allelic.html

People who are seriously into mutation geekery might like my article on coloration mechanics and the effect of mutations: http://www.littlefeatheredbuddies.com/info/breed-coloration.html I've been wanting a resource like this for a long time but I couldn't find one anywhere, so I wrote my own.
 

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Susanne's e-book is here for anyone who wants to buy a copy: http://www.amazon.com/Cockatiel-Mutations-Bounty-Susanne-Russo-ebook/dp/B009IRGLWC/

It's a very useful book and I use it a lot, but I'd classify it as a mutation guide rather than a book on genetics. She's phenomenal with the observational stuff, but sciency stuff isn't her strong point. Terry Martin and several other writers are better sources of genetic information, and Susanne's book is a better visual guide to the mutations.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for that explanation, the kirstenmunz calculator won't run for me so I have stuck with gencalc. The other thing I am unsure about is the splits which are x1 and x2. Are these paternally and maternally inherited splits?
I will follow up on the little feathered buddies links so thanks for that too.
 

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X1 is the X chromosome the male got from his father and X2 is the one he got from his mother. But it doesn't really matter which parent he got a particular gene from. What DOES matter is whether two or more sex-linked splits are on the same chromosome or on different chromosomes. Lutino on one X and cinnamon on the other X will give you different results than having both of them on the same X.
 
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